Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
Favorites (0)
Search:
'Naval Reactors' in subject
rss icon RSS | Modify Search | New Search | nrhdb Home
Results:  225 itemsBrowse by Facet | Title
Sorted by:  
Page: Prev  1 2 3 4 5   ...  Next
Date
unknown (31)
2014 (1)
expand2013 (4)
expand2012 (8)
expand2011 (8)
expand2010 (18)
expand2009 (6)
expand2008 (4)
expand2007 (3)
expand2006 (7)
expand2005 (6)
expand2004 (2)
expand2003 (8)
expand2002 (3)
2001 (2)
expand2000 (1)
1999? (1)
expand1999 (1)
expand1998 (4)
expand1995 (2)
1994 (2)
1993 (1)
expand1992 (2)
1990 (1)
1989 (1)
1987 (1)
1986 (1)
1984 (3)
1983? (1)
expand1982 (1)
expand1979 (4)
expand1977 (1)
1976? (1)
1976 (2)
1975 (3)
1974 (2)
expand1973 (1)
1972 (1)
1971 (1)
1970? (1)
1970 (1)
expand1969 (4)
expand1968 (2)
expand1967 (3)
1966? (1)
1966 (1)
expand1965 (1)
1964? (1)
expand1964 (8)
1963 (1)
1962? (1)
expand1962 (2)
1961? (1)
expand1961 (5)
1960? (1)
expand1960 (6)
expand1959 (5)
1958? (1)
expand1958 (7)
expand1957 (5)
1956? (3)
expand1956 (5)
1955? (2)
expand1955 (4)
1954? (1)
1952? (1)
1951? (1)
Type
Text (113)
Image (112)
21Title:  S1W propulsion plant - view from the floor Add
 Summary:  View of the S1W prototype plant, looking aft to forward. The water tank on the right surrounded the reactor compartment. This design enabled Naval Reactors to assess the reflection of radiation from the core and primary system back into the hull. The cylindrical hull contained the engine rooms and a maneuvering room (the control room for the reactor and propulsion systems). The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. In June, the S1W plant successfully completed a 100 hour continuous run, illustrating that nuclear-powered submarines would revolutionize naval operations. 
 Source:  http://www.subguru.com/nautilus571.htm 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 182-186. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
22Title:  Artist's conception of CVN 21-class carrier Add
 Summary:  An artist's concept of a CVN 21 reactor, the first of which will be the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), scheduled for commissioning in 2015. The CVN 21 carriers will be powered by two A1B reactor plants, the successor to the A4W plant. 
 Source:  http://navalphotos.blogspot.com/2011_01_31_archive.html 
 Date:  08 July 2005 
 Subject(s):  A1B | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
23Title:  Atomic shield: A history of the United States Atomic Energy Commission Add
 Chapter title:  "Science: Shield of the free world?" 
 Summary:  This chapter describes some early Naval Reactors-led development efforts in the context of other activities of the Atomic Energy Commission. In 1952, three development efforts were underway: S1W and S2W (Mark I and Mark II) design and construction; S1G (Mark A) design and construction; and, design work for a carrier reactor - an effort that evolved into the civilian reactor plant for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The carrier project in 1950-1952 was based on a breeder reactor design that would enable the AEC to meet three goals: Moving forward with large ship propulsion; increasing plutonium production; and, increasing electric power production. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1969 
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
24Title:  Navy Virginia (SSN-774) class attack submarine procurement: Background and issues for Congress Add
 Summary:  This Congressional Research Service report, authored by naval affairs specialist Ronald O'Rourke, describes procurement issues relating to Virginia-class attack submarines. O'Rourke describes the joint production arrangement for the Virginia class: "GD/EB builds certain parts of each boat, Newport News builds certain other parts of each boat, and the yards take turns building the reactor compartments and performing final assembly of the boats" (4). One crucial benefit of this arrangement, in the two U.S. shipyards currently qualified to build nuclear submarines, is that it "preserves both yards' ability to build submarine reactor compartments (a key capability for a submarine-construction yard) and perform submarine final-assembly work" (4). The joint arrangement is in the context of the Virginia-class program, in which submarines are "being procured at a relatively low annual rate" of 1-2 boats per year (4). The author also describes a projected shortfall in available U.S. attack submarines (the number of available submarines is expected to dip to a low of 39 in 2030) and some steps that could mitigate this shortfall, including reducing the length of shipyard construction time for Virginia-class boats from 72 to 60 months. 
 Source:  http://opencrs.com/document/RL32418/ 
 Date:   2010 
 Subject(s):  S9G | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
25Title:  The S1W prototype, the world's first naval nuclear reactor plant Add
 Summary:  The S1W plant, prototype for the USS Nautilus. Under the leadership of Hyman Rickover, Naval Reactors followed a concurrent design approach, with the design and construction of the S1W (then named Mark I) plant slightly leading the design and construction of the Nautilus. The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. Historians Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan noted that the S1W "was the world's first fully-engineered nuclear reactor capable of producing practical amounts of energy on a sustained and reliable basis" (186). The S1W was used to support plant testing and operator training for decades and was decommissioned in 1989. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 164-165, 182-186. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
 Similar items:  Find
26Title:  S1W prototype plant - port side, stern view of plant Add
 Summary:  The S1W (Nautilus) prototype plant, with the water brake for the shaft barely visible on the lower right. Under Hyman Rickover's leadership, the S1W (or Mark I) plant was built as both an engineering and a shipboard prototype, with the plant being assembled inside of a cylindrical hull. While this approach had disadvantages (for example, making it difficult to observe equipment operations in the hull's cramped spaces), it significantly reduced the time required to build the follow-up Mark II plant, on board the USS Nautilus. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman, and Thomas B. Allen. Rickover: Controversy and Genius, a Biography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1984, pages 149-153. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
 Similar items:  Find
27Title:  A1W under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  The A1W prototype, under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory. Heat-dissipating spray ponds used by the S1W prototype are visible in the foreground. A1W was a two reactor, one steam plant/shaft prototype plant, parallel to one of the Enterprise's four propulsion plants. Construction of the A1W prototype began in the spring of 1956; first criticality for the first of its two reactors was achieved in October 1958. As with the S1W plant and the Nautilus, the design and construction of the A1W prototype slightly led that of the USS Enterprise. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 280-281 and 317. 
 Date:  circa 1956 
 Subject(s):  A1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
 Similar items:  Find
28Title:  Exterior view of the A1W (Enterprise prototype) at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  The A1W prototype (center) at the Idaho National Laboratory. Construction began on the A1W in April 1956; the prototype consisted of two reactors and the steam plant equipment necessary to drive one shaft. The first A1W reactor reached full power on 17 January 1959 and both reactors operatored together at full power for the first time on 15 September 1959. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 101-102. 
 Date:  circa 1958 
 Subject(s):  A1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
 Similar items:  Find
29Title:  Monitoring equipment outside S1W hull Add
 Summary:  Navy and civilian operators with monitoring equipment at the aft end of the S1W propulsion plant. The S1W's water brake, which absorbed the shaft power, can be seen directly behind the monitoring panel. The aft end of the hull is visible at left. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
 Similar items:  Find
30Title:  Aerial view of the S1W prototype building Add
 Summary:  An aerial view of the S1W prototype building, located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The S1W (or Mark I) plant was the world's first power reactor; it used pressurized water as both coolant and moderator. S1W served as the prototype plant for the USS Nautilus, and as a testing and training plant for the Naval Reactors program until 1989. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_08.pdf 
 Reference:  Rockwell, Theodore. The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made a Difference. Lincoln, NE: IUniverse, 2002, pages 117-145. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
 Similar items:  Find
Page: Prev  1 2 3 4 5   ...  Next

nrhdb Home