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11Title:  Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program meeting on Spent Naval Fuel (SNF) Add
 Summary:  This report includes a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for Acceptance of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) between the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) and the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The agreement "establishes the terms and conditions under which [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] will make available disposal services to NNPP for naval SNF" (3). More specifically, it was designed to "achieve safe and timely disposal of naval SNF by identifying data needs, interfaces and acceptance criteria and developing compliance procedures needed to support the acceptance of naval SNF" by the Department of Energy. 
 Source:  http://pbadupws.nrc.gov/docs/ML0331/ML033180083.pdf 
 Date:  10 December 1998 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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12Title:  Engineering Duty Officer Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Add
 Summary:  This Naval Sea Systems Command instruction describes "the objectives and requirements of the Engineering Duty Officer Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program" (1). Engineering Duty Officers (EDOs) in the program support the cradle-to-grave management responsibilities for all aspects of naval nuclear propulsion, including research, specification, construction, testing, refueling, defueling, and disposal activities. The training requirements for EDOs are summarized in the document, including completion of the Bettis Reactor Engineering School curriculum (equivalent to a Masters Degree in Nuclear Engineering). A separate set of training requirements is listed for officers with prior service in the nuclear propulsion program; these requirements must be completed before receiving the Engineering Duty Officer designator of 144X. 
 Source:  www.navsea.navy.mil/NAVINST/03540-004.pdf 
 Date:  17 March 1999 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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13Title:  Atoms for Peace + 50: Nuclear energy & science for the 21st century Add
 Summary:  Transcript of remarks by Admiral Frank Bowman, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, at a Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis-sponsored conference in 2003. Bowman advocates for commercial nuclear power, arguing that the United States "take immediate steps to significantly increase our energy production from nuclear power" (3). He describes the primary attributes of the Naval Reactors program, including: "technical excellence and technical competence"; high standards for personnel selection; "formality and discipline" in plant operations; and, an approach to reactor safety that "mainsteams in each operator a total commitment to safety" (2). Bowman advocates for improved public education on nuclear power and radiation exposure to improve public support for commercial nuclear power. There are some typographical errors in this document. 
 Source:  http://www.ifpafletcherconference.com/oldtranscripts/2003/DOE/bowman.pdf 
 Date:  22 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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14Title:  Nuclear propulsion for naval surface vessels Add
 Summary:  This Joint Committee on Atomic Energy document, published in 1964, is centered on Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara's 1963 decision to make CV-67 (later commissioned as the USS John F. Kennedy) a conventionally-powered, oil-fired carrier. As committee chairman Sen. John Pastore notes in the hearing, one critical point of concern is the degree to which this decision represented a policy statement by the Defense Department on nuclear propulsion for surface ships generally and aircraft carriers specifically. Also, during the testimony of Secretary of the Navy Fred Korth, Pastore and other committee members express frustration over Korth's inability to cite any Defense Department officials opposed to making the CV-67 nuclear-powered (even though Korth testifies that both he and Chief of Naval Operations David McDonald supported nuclear propulsion for the carrier). During the hearing, Pastore also cites the Joint Committee's leadership on atomic power (including the development of the hydrogen bomb and the construction of the USS Nautilus, the world's first nuclear-powered submarine). Pastore notes that McNamara's decision on CV-67 was counter to the committee's wishes. As Chet Holifield notes during the hearing, this decision makes it difficult for the Joint Committee to continue to fund research on naval reactors applications. Dr. Harold Brown (later Secretary of Defense under President Carter) testifies in support of McNamara's decision. The advantages of nuclear propulsion for aircraft carriers, as demonstrated in the USS Enterprise, are central to the dispute over CV-67. Brown asserts that "nuclear propulsion may provide a means of achieving a major increase in the combat capabilities of surface warships, as it has done in the case of submarines, but it is not certain at this time that such will be the case." In contrast, Korth, McDonald, and Vice Admiral Hyman Rickover of Naval Reactors all testify in support of CV-67 being built as a nuclear-powered carrier because of the capabilities demonstrated by the Enterprise following its commissioning in November 1961. During the hearing, Admiral Rickover testifies on reactor development, noting that a four reactor carrier could be installed in the CV-67 that would generate the same power as the Enterprise's eight reactors. This would reduce operating personnel costs relative to the Enterprise's eight A2W reactors. Additionally, the time between refueling would be lengthened for the four reactor carrier, compared with the Enterprise's reactor plants. In one sense, the Joint Committee's resistance to McNamara's ruling on CV-67 did have a long-term effect, in that the John F. Kennedy was the final oil-fired aircraft carrier to be appropriated and constructed. 
 Source:  http://collections.stanford.edu/atomicenergy/bin/detail?fileID=1228277303 
 Date:   1964 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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15Title:  Report of the Underseas Warfare Advisory Panel to the Subcommittee on Military Applications. August 1958 Add
 Summary:  This report was produced by the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy's Underseas Warfare Advisory Panel to the Subcommittee on Military Applications. It was motivated in part upon the planned construction of ballistic missile submarines, which employed two technologies, "the nuclear-propelled submarine, and the submarine-launched intermediate-range ballistic missile" (5). Several of the recommendations impacted the size of the Naval Reactors program, including requests that "the rate and scale of our attack submarine construction program should be significantly increased" and that "the Navy should immediately proceed with the construction of an initial task unit of nine Polaris submarines, and authorization and appropriations for this purpose should be requested of the present session of the Congress" (4). The S5W reactor plant was used in the early ballistic missile submarines, beginning with the USS George Washington. 
 Source:  http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/3331944 
 Date:   1958 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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16Title:  Nuclear propulsion for naval warships Add
 Summary:  This document is a hearing and inquiry record of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy's Subcommittee on Military Applications regarding the application of nuclear propulsion to naval warships. The primary issue of concern to the Joint Committee is the slow adoption of naval nuclear propulsion, a point of contention between the committee and the Department of Defense for more than a decade (under three administrations). The programs and vessels that the Joint Committee was most concerned about in 1972 included the high-speed fast attack submarine (Los Angeles-class); the need for more Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carriers; the Trident ballistic missile submarine; and, the construction of more nuclear-powered frigates (carrier escort vessels). Vice Admiral Hyman Rickover, who led the Naval Reactors program at the time, testifies at his hearing in strong support of all of these programs. He describes the benefits of the Trident missile submarine, including longer-range missiles, which would make anti-submarine operations by the Soviet Union much more difficult when compared with Polaris submarines. Chief of Naval Operations Elmo Zumwalt describes the Department of Defense's position on nuclear propulsion: "The value of nuclear propulsion is unquestionable. The Navy has stated and will continue to positively state its requirements for nuclear propelled ships to provide strategic flexibility. However, fiscal feasibility and the need for balance in numbers and types of weapons systems in the face of a powerful and diversified Soviet naval capability will continue to be the governing factors in formulating our nuclear programs" (38). Assistant Secretary of Defense David Packard provides additional information on the Department of Defense's position in written testimony and responses to Joint Committee questions. The committee's questions on funding for CVN-70 (later named the USS Carl Vinson) emphasize the long-term contention between it and the executive branch over nuclear-powered carrier construction. One of the questions notes that the expected costs for CVN-70 would increase by more than $125 million if advanced procurement funds were delayed, "due to the disruption which would occur to the special nuclear propulsion plant component production lines established from the Nimitz class carriers," following the construction of the USS Nimitz and the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. Packard accepts the estimate's accuracy, but adds that he cannot support the CVN-70 until certain criteria are met, noting that "when I am satisfied that the Navy has an adequate program to provide the weapons, both offensive and defensive, and the operational doctrine needed to meet the threat environment of the decade of the 1980's, I would consider approving the CVAN-70" (102). 
 Source:  http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/3162437 
 Date:   1972 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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17Title:  The United States Navy Nuclear Propulsion Program: Over 151 million miles safely steamed on nuclear power Add
 Summary:  An informal and informative history of joint Department of Energy-Department of the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Program. 
 Source:  http://nnsa.energy.gov/sites/default/files/nnsa/04-14-inlinefiles/2014-04-09%202013_Naval_Nuclear_Propulsion_Program.pdf 
 Date:   2013 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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18Title:  S5G prototype during natural circulation reactor testing Add
 Summary:  The S5G (Narwhal prototype) plant at the Idaho National Laboratory. The S5G prototype and Narwhal plants used natural circulation in the primary loop to reduce plant noise, as an alternative to forced circulation of primary coolant using reactor coolant pumps. In this photo, the prototype plant is being floated in a tank in order to determine the effects of rolling and pitching on the reactor's operation. The S5G reator achieved initial criticality on 12 September 1965. S5G was used as a training and testing prototype by Naval Reactors until the mid-1990s 
 Source:  http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=45325547583 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 23-27. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S5G | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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19Title:  Exterior view of the A1W prototype, Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  An exterior view of the A1W prototype plant at the Idaho National Laboratory. A1W was the prototype for the Enterprise A2W shipboard reactor plants; the prototype contained two reactors and the steam plant equipment to power one shaft. Data from the A1W prototype were also used in the design of the C1W reactor plant, which powered the USS Long Beach. 
 Source:  http://www.aa9dy.com/places/moreidaho.htm 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 280-281. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  A1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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20Title:  Aerial view of the S1C prototype plant Add
 Summary:  An aerial view of the S1C prototype plant building. The S1C was the prototype for the Tullibee (SSN-597), a small (approximately 2,300 tons displacement) hunter-killer submarine. The plant was designed and constructed by Combustion Engineering and was located at the company's plant in Windsor, Connecticut. The plant's design was unique in that steam turbines powered an electric propulsion motor, as opposed to a set of reduction gears. 
 Source:  http://www.coldwar-ct.com/Knoll_Labs_-_Windsor.html 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 317 and 355. 
 Date:   1987 
 Subject(s):  S1C | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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