Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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1Title:  Infrastructure - Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Add
 Summary:  This diagram describes the work of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, a joint Department of Energy and Navy program. Naval Reactors is "responsible for design, development, operation, and disposal of Naval nuclear propulsion plants." The program's training includes Naval Nuclear Power School (theoretical training) and prototype training, which is currently conducted on board moored ships and at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory's Kesselring site. NR oversees the work performed by public and private shipyards and contractual relationships with hundreds of specialized vendors. It also works with two major laboratories, Bettis and Knolls. This chart underscores the complexity of NR and the fact that its available infrastructure is managed by a relatively small central organization. 
 Source:  http://www.fas.org/man/gao/nsiad98001/c1.htm 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  GIF 
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2Title:  Aerial view of General Dynamics Electric Boat Add
 Summary:  An aerial photo of the General Dynamics Electric Boat yard in Groton, Connecticut. Electric Boat designed and built the first two nuclear submarines, the Nautilus and the Seawolf, and served as the lead yard for the early nuclear submarine classes, such as Skate and Skipjack. Electric Boat continues its pivotal role in submarine design and construction, including its lead yard responsibility for the USS Virginia (SSN-774) class of attack submarines. 
 Source:  http://www.sprol.com/2005/05/connecticut-submarines-part-2-general-dynamics-electric-boat-division/ 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 297-307. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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3Title:  S5G prototype during natural circulation reactor testing Add
 Summary:  The S5G (Narwhal prototype) plant at the Idaho National Laboratory. The S5G prototype and Narwhal plants used natural circulation in the primary loop to reduce plant noise, as an alternative to forced circulation of primary coolant using reactor coolant pumps. In this photo, the prototype plant is being floated in a tank in order to determine the effects of rolling and pitching on the reactor's operation. The S5G reator achieved initial criticality on 12 September 1965. S5G was used as a training and testing prototype by Naval Reactors until the mid-1990s 
 Source:  http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=45325547583 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 23-27. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S5G | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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4Title:  Exterior view of the A1W prototype, Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  An exterior view of the A1W prototype plant at the Idaho National Laboratory. A1W was the prototype for the Enterprise A2W shipboard reactor plants; the prototype contained two reactors and the steam plant equipment to power one shaft. Data from the A1W prototype were also used in the design of the C1W reactor plant, which powered the USS Long Beach. 
 Source:  http://www.aa9dy.com/places/moreidaho.htm 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 280-281. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  A1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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5Title:  Aerial view of the S1C prototype plant Add
 Summary:  An aerial view of the S1C prototype plant building. The S1C was the prototype for the Tullibee (SSN-597), a small (approximately 2,300 tons displacement) hunter-killer submarine. The plant was designed and constructed by Combustion Engineering and was located at the company's plant in Windsor, Connecticut. The plant's design was unique in that steam turbines powered an electric propulsion motor, as opposed to a set of reduction gears. 
 Source:  http://www.coldwar-ct.com/Knoll_Labs_-_Windsor.html 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 317 and 355. 
 Date:   1987 
 Subject(s):  S1C | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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6Title:  S1W propulsion plant - view from the floor Add
 Summary:  View of the S1W prototype plant, looking aft to forward. The water tank on the right surrounded the reactor compartment. This design enabled Naval Reactors to assess the reflection of radiation from the core and primary system back into the hull. The cylindrical hull contained the engine rooms and a maneuvering room (the control room for the reactor and propulsion systems). The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. In June, the S1W plant successfully completed a 100 hour continuous run, illustrating that nuclear-powered submarines would revolutionize naval operations. 
 Source:  http://www.subguru.com/nautilus571.htm 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 182-186. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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7Title:  Artist's conception of CVN 21-class carrier Add
 Summary:  An artist's concept of a CVN 21 reactor, the first of which will be the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), scheduled for commissioning in 2015. The CVN 21 carriers will be powered by two A1B reactor plants, the successor to the A4W plant. 
 Source:  http://navalphotos.blogspot.com/2011_01_31_archive.html 
 Date:  08 July 2005 
 Subject(s):  A1B | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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8Title:  The S1W prototype, the world's first naval nuclear reactor plant Add
 Summary:  The S1W plant, prototype for the USS Nautilus. Under the leadership of Hyman Rickover, Naval Reactors followed a concurrent design approach, with the design and construction of the S1W (then named Mark I) plant slightly leading the design and construction of the Nautilus. The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. Historians Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan noted that the S1W "was the world's first fully-engineered nuclear reactor capable of producing practical amounts of energy on a sustained and reliable basis" (186). The S1W was used to support plant testing and operator training for decades and was decommissioned in 1989. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 164-165, 182-186. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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9Title:  S1W prototype plant - port side, stern view of plant Add
 Summary:  The S1W (Nautilus) prototype plant, with the water brake for the shaft barely visible on the lower right. Under Hyman Rickover's leadership, the S1W (or Mark I) plant was built as both an engineering and a shipboard prototype, with the plant being assembled inside of a cylindrical hull. While this approach had disadvantages (for example, making it difficult to observe equipment operations in the hull's cramped spaces), it significantly reduced the time required to build the follow-up Mark II plant, on board the USS Nautilus. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman, and Thomas B. Allen. Rickover: Controversy and Genius, a Biography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1984, pages 149-153. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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10Title:  A1W under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  The A1W prototype, under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory. Heat-dissipating spray ponds used by the S1W prototype are visible in the foreground. A1W was a two reactor, one steam plant/shaft prototype plant, parallel to one of the Enterprise's four propulsion plants. Construction of the A1W prototype began in the spring of 1956; first criticality for the first of its two reactors was achieved in October 1958. As with the S1W plant and the Nautilus, the design and construction of the A1W prototype slightly led that of the USS Enterprise. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 280-281 and 317. 
 Date:  circa 1956 
 Subject(s):  A1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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