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1Title:  Naval spent nuclear fuel management Add
 Summary:  This document provides a planning and options overview of spent fuel handling for naval reactors plants as of 1994. Attachment A provides, as noted in the scope statement, "an evaluation of the radiological and non-radiological risks associated with the transportation of naval spent nuclear fuel and [irradiated] test specimens that originate from Navy and commercial shipyards, prototypes, and related Department of Energy laboratories" (A-1). These materials have historically been handled at the Idaho National Laboratory's Expended Core Facility. It continues by describing five alternatives for the handling and management of spent fuel generated from naval nuclear propulsion plants. This section also describes, in depth, the locations that send and receive shipments; spent nuclear fuel shipping containers; transport methods for containers; and, information on potential exposure from the transportation of spent fuel containers. On the latter point, information on accident analyses (along with exposure as the result of incident-free transport) is included. Attachment B provides in-depth information on spent fuel handling activities at the Expended Core Facility. Attachment C has information on the storage of spent fuels in water pools in comparison with dry containers. It notes that "water pools have historically been the method of choice for interim storage and fuel handling because: (1) water has a high thermal capacity for the removal of heat from the fuel, (2) the transparency of water facilitates the inspection and movement of the fuel, (3) water is an excellent gamma and neutron shield, (4) water is easy to purify and recycle, and (5) water provides a means to prevent release of radioactive material into the air" (C-1). Attachment D describes the storage of spent fuel at naval shipyards and prototypes, after its removal from naval reactors. Attachment E fleshes out the fuel handling and storage alternatives by "describ[ing] the options for establishing new or modified facilities that essentially duplicate the capabilities of the existing Expended Core Facility (ECF)" (E-1). Finally, attachment F provides "estimated environmental consequences, event probabilities, and risk (a product of probability and consequence) for both normal operations and postulated accident scenarios related to the storage and examination of naval spent nuclear fuel" (F-1). Current plans call for the recapitalization of the Expended Core Facility through the Spent Fuel Handling Recapitalization Project, through the construction of a new facility at the Idaho National Laboratory or by overhauling the existing facility. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1994 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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2Title:  Notice of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the recapitalization of infrastructure supporting naval spent nuclear fuel handling and examination at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  As noted in the summary section, "the [Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program] intends to prepare an [Environmental Impact Statement] for the recapitalization of infrastructure at the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at the [Idaho National Laboratory] in Idaho" (1). The supplementary information section nicely summarizes Naval Reactors' cradle-to-grave responsibility for nuclear propulsion and the role of the Expended Core Facility in "support[ing] the design and maintenance of nuclear propulsion systems by providing for the examination of spent nuclear fuel and irradiated materials" (2). The ECF works "to provide data on current reactor performance, to validate models used to predict future performance, and to support research to improve reactor design" (2). The notice describes the fact that "a significant portion of the ECF infrastructure has been in service for over 50 years" (3). The planned recapitalization work is intended to extend ECF's ability to support naval nuclear propulsion spent fuel activities for another 40 years. 
 Source:  http://www.ecfrecapitalization.us/ 
 Date:  19 July 2010 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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3Title:  Joint motion for entry of consent order based on settlement agreement Add
 Summary:  This document contains the joint settlement agreement of 1995 regarding spent fuel processing activities at the Idaho National Laboratory's Expended Core Facility (ECF). The parties to the agreement include the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the United States Navy. The ECF plays a critical role in Naval Reactors' cradle-to-grave support for naval nuclear propulsion. By the terms of the agreement, "the Navy may make only those shipments of naval spent fuel to [the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] that are necessary to meet national security requirements to defuel or refuel nuclear powered submarines, surface warships, or naval prototype or training reactors, or to ensure examination of naval spent fuel from these sources" (3). The agreement defines the maximum amount of spent fuel that can be shipped to INL each year. Additionally, it mandates that all spent fuel, excluding that used for testing, must be removed from the INL by 2035. The agreement mandates that transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Laboratory be moved to another waste handling facility, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, by 2018. In summary, the agreement supports the ECF's spent fuel processing activities in support of naval nuclear propulsion while reducing the Department of Energy's and Navy's ability to use INL as a long-term storage site for spent fuel and other highly radioactive materials. 
 Source:  http://www.ecfrecapitalization.us/Idaho-agreement_1995.pdf 
 Date:  17 October 1995 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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4Title:  Addendum to 1995 settlement agreement Add
 Summary:  This is an addendum to the 1995 joint settlement agreement regarding spent fuel processing activities at the Idaho National Laboratory's Expended Core Facility (ECF). The parties to the agreement and its addendum include the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the United States Navy. It clarifies how the Naval Reactors program can use the ECF for spent fuel processing. The addendum explicitly states that "all Naval spent fuel shipped to Idaho after January 1, 2035, must meet the national security requirements" described in the 1995 settlement (1). It also defines specific spent fuel volumes that may be maintained at the facility. For example, metric tons limits are stated for fuel being used for examination and "queuing for shipment to a repository or storage facility outside Idaho" (2). As with the original 1995 settlement agreement, the addendum supports the work of the joint Navy-Department of Energy Naval Reactors program in its spent fuel processing activities at the ECF, while reducing the ability to use the INL for the long-term storage of spent reactor fuel. 
 Source:  http://www.ecfrecapitalization.us/ 
 Date:  04 June 2008 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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5Title:  Public scoping meeting: Environmental Impact Statement for the recapitalization of infrastructure supporting naval spent nuclear fuel handling and examination at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  An informational brochure that describes the Spent Fuel Handling Recapitalization Project at the Expended Core Facility. It provides an overview of ECF's operations and the importance of spent fuel processing activities to the Naval Reactors program. 
 Source:  http://www.ecfrecapitalization.us/ 
 Date:   2010 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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6Title:  Amended notice of intent to revise the scope of an Environmental Impact Statement for the recapitalization of infrastructure supporting naval spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  In this May 2012 Federal Register announcement, "the DOE Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) announce[d] its intent to revise the scope to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Recapitalization of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling and Examination Facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)" (27448). The announcement invited comments for a revised and narrower scope for recapitalization (compared with that described in a July 2010 Federal Register announcement). It describes the responsibilities of the Naval Reactors organization ("all aspects of U.S. Navy nuclear power and propulsion," including the management of spent nuclear fuel removed from naval reactor cores during defueling and refueling operations") (27448). It provides a high-level overview of how the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at the INL supports the program's spent fuel handling efforts, describes issues with facilities aging, and includes a short description of ECF recapitalization efforts. As noted, comments are solicited on the recapitalization of spent fuel handling facilities, with three alternative scenarios being considered, including the construction of a new spent fuel handling facility, upgrade of existing facilities at the ECF, and maintenance of existing capabilities. 
 Source:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-10/pdf/2012-11292.pdf#page=1 
 Date:  10 May 2012 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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7Title:  The Expended Core Facility (ECF) under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  The Expended Core Facility under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory. The S1W building is visible in the background. The ECF was designed to support the processing of spent fuel cores starting with the initial core of the USS Nautilus, which was removed from the vessel in early 1957. Inside the ECF, cores are moved from one water pit workstation to another; its size was expanded from an initial 340 feet to over 1,000 feet in length. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Stacy, Susan M. Proving the Principle: A History of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, 1949-1999. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Idaho Operations Office of the Dept. of Energy, 2000, pages 86-89. 
 Date:  circa 1956 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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8Title:  Irradiated core materials received at the Expended Core Facility Add
 Summary:  Workers on the defueling platform at the Expended Core Facility (ECF), located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Rail cars enter the ECF and the transfer cask shown in the photo (just above the workers) is used to hoist expended fuel into a water pit, where processing begins. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Stacy, Susan M. Proving the Principle: A History of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, 1949-1999. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Idaho Operations Office of the Dept. of Energy, 2000, pages 86-89. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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9Title:  FY 2014 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This document contains the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) congressional budget request for FY 2014, which includes a request for $1.246 billion dollars for Naval Reactors. The request notes that Naval Reactors manages "96 operating reactor plants. This includes 72 submarines, 10 aircraft carriers, and 4 research, development, and training platforms (including the land-based prototypes)" (643). It also describes several milestones for the Naval Reactors program for the previous fiscal year, including the commissioning and construction of Virginia-class submarines. Two planned milestones for FY 2014 are stated: The "cumulative completion of 99% of the Gerald R. Ford-class next-generation aircraft carrier reactor plant design" and the "cumulative completion of 22% of the Ohio-class Ballistic Missile Submarine Replacement (Ohio replacement) reactor plant design" (642). The significant advances that will be achieved by the new plant design for the Gerald R. Ford-class (the A1B reactor) are mentioned in the request. Compared with the A4W reactor plants that power Nimitz-class carriers, the A1B "increases core energy, provides nearly three times the electric plant generating capability, and requires half the number of reactor department sailors" (643). Support for three major projects is included in the NNSA request: The Ohio-class development; refueling and overhaul of the S8G prototype; and, recapitalization of spent fuel processing equipment at the Idaho National Laboratory's Expended Core Facility (ECF). The ECF's mission and the importance of this recapitalization project are described in detail: "The ECF provides the infrastructure to unload shipping containers and transfer, prepare, temporarily store, and package naval spent nuclear fuel for disposal" (664). While maintenance and repair operations are performed for the ECF infrastructure, the recapitalization work is needed to ensure that the ECF can meet the demands for spent fuel processing and to avoid any "mission-compromising interruptions" that would threaten operations of the nuclear fleet (664). 
 Source:  http://nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/budget 
 Date:   2013 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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10Title:  Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  An aerial view of the Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NRF was the site of the S1W, A1W, and S5G prototypes. The site's Expended Core Facility remains open to support the processing of spent fuel from United States naval reactors. 
 Source:  http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=45325547583 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | A1W | S5G | Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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