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Shippingport Atomic Power Station[X]
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11Title:  Reactor vessel closure head Add
 Summary:  The closure head is lowered to the top of the reactor vessel in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The closure head had 46 penetrations; 32 for the control rod drive mechanisms, along with refueling and instrumentation ports. The closure head was bolted and welded to the lower section of the reaction vessel to create a pressure-tight and leak-tight seal. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 63-69. 
 Date:  20 April 1964 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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12Title:  Main coolant pump removed from operation Add
 Summary:  A reactor coolant pump removed from operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Shippingport reactor used four reactor coolant pumps, one for each primary loop. The single-stage, leak proof centrifugal pump supported the flow of coolant in the primary system; in addition to the coolant flow through the pump, lower temperature water circulated within the pump to remove heat and lubricate the motor bearings. The pump was powered by a 2,300 volt electric motor that supported full-speed and half-speed operations. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 31-33. 
 Date:  08 May 1964 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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13Title:  Foster Wheeler straight tube steam generator Add
 Summary:  One of the two Foster Wheeler straight tube steam generators being placed in a boiler room in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Each generator contained 2,096 stainless steel tubes, with each tube having an outer diameter of one-half inch. The heads of the steam generator each had 18 inch pipe connections to the secondary system. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 33-34. 
 Date:  10 August 1958 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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14Title:  Babcock & Wilcox U-shell design steam generator Add
 Summary:  One of the two Babcock & Wilcox Company U-shell steam generators being placed in a boiler room at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Each steam generator contained 921 stainless steel tubes, with an outside diameter of 3/4 inch. The U-shaped shells were 38 inches in diameter. It had two hemispherical heads with pipe connections through which primary coolant entered and exited the steam generator. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 33-34. 
 Date:  12 September 1956 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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15Title:  Downcomers and risers piping, Shippingport secondary plant Add
 Summary:  Piping for downcomers and risers in the B loop of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. These pipes connected the loop's Babcock & Wilcox U-shell steam generator with a steam drum, and through the steam drum with the plant's secondary system. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, page 33. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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16Title:  Instructions to bring Shippingport power breeder to 100 percent reactor power Add
 Summary:  An image showing President Jimmy Carter's instructions on 2 December 1987 to operators at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station to "increase light-water breeder reactor power to 100%" (191). Carter issued the order from the White House in a ceremony attended by Secretary of Energy James Schlesinger, Admiral Hyman Rickover, and other Naval Reactors officials; it marked the beginning of routine operations at the Shippingport plant following its conversion to a breeder reactor. The core, which generated more fuel than it consumed, was composed of U-233 and Thorium. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 190-192. 
 Date:  02 December 1977 
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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17Title:  Seed fuel assembly being removed from reactor vessel by an extraction crane Add
 Summary:  A highly-enriched Uranium fuel element is removed from the Shippingport reactor core in 1960. Alvin Radkowsky, the chief physicist for Naval Reactors, "suggested the possibility of using a 'seed' of highly-enriched uranium surrounded by a much larger 'blanket' of natural uranium" (244). This core design approach offered several advantages, including ease of refueling (by replacing the seed elements), and was employed in the Shippingport reactor cores during the plant's operations, including the Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core that was used from 1977 to 1982. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 242-246. 
 Date:  07 January 1960 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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18Title:  Atoms for peace and war: A history of the United States Atomic Energy Commission Add
 Chapter title:  "Nuclear power for the market place" 
 Summary:  The authors of this AEC official history, Richard Hewlett and Jack Holl, note the starting point: "in the case of nuclear power...the entire technology was confined within the federal government in 1953" (VII-1). This fact underscores the central leadership role that the AEC was required to take to launch a commercial nuclear power industry in the United States. They note that the success of the S1W (or Mark I) reactor, which began full-power operations in mid-1953, "convinced government officials and members of the Joint Committee [on Atomic Energy] that nuclear power was a reality" (VII-4). Rickover's success with the S1W led the AEC to assign the Naval Reactors organization with the responsibility of overseeing the design and construction of the first commercial power reactor, which became the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Like the S1W and the Nautilus shipyard plant, the Shippingport reactor was a pressurized water reactor. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1989 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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19Title:  Pressure vessel and piping codes applicable to the PWR reactor plant Add
 Summary:  This document provides information on standards compliance for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) installed in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station at the time of publication. The ASME standard, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, sections I and VIII, are referenced in the compliance summary, which maps code compliance to specific areas and components of the reactor plant. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1957 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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20Title:  Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (September 9 to October 20, 1955) Add
 Summary:  This 1955 report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. At this time, Westinghouse was the leading designer and builder of naval nuclear propulsion plants, having constructed the Mark I (S1W prototype) and Mark II (Nautilus shipboard) reactors, and designed the S5W submarine fleet reactor. Additionally, Westinghouse was working under the direction of the Naval Reactors organization on the design and construction of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station plant, the first large-scale nuclear power plant that provided power for civilian use. The report describes Westinghouse.s progress (and work with other vendors) in the design and fabrication of reactor core and primary and secondary system components for the Shippingport plant. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:  circa 1955 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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