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1Title:  Main control console at Shippingport (looking north) Add
 Summary:  The main control console for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. While the Naval Reactors organization, working with Westinghouse, led the design and development of the Shippingport reactor, some aspects of the plant - such as the large size of the control panels and the use of concrete for shielding - were quite different when compared with the submarine reactor plants that had been designed and built under NR's oversight. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 240-242. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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2Title:  Main control console at Shippingport (looking south) Add
 Summary:  A view of the control room at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, with the reactor control panel on the left and the turbine control panel in the center. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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3Title:  Shippingport station decommissioning project: Overview and justification Add
 Summary:  This 1984 report, written by Frank E. Coffman of the Department of Energy, is a support justification for the decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, the first nuclear power plant that produced significant amounts of energy for civilian use. The report's short history mentions the ongoing relationship between the Naval Reactors organization and the Shippingport plant ("operated by Duquesne Light Company under supervision of the DOE Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Naval Reactors"). The document describes several decommissioning options and the financial benefits of dismantling the plant in a short timeframe. Just as the Shippingport plant served as a model for the design, construction, and operation of commercial nuclear power plants, Coffman envisions Shippingport serving as a model for the decommissioning process, the first "full scale power reactor decommissioning demonstration project." The Shippingport plant dismantlement began in 1985. In December 1988, its reactor vessel was removed from the containment building and shipped to the Hanford Site for burial. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1984 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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4Title:  Instructions to bring Shippingport power breeder to 100 percent reactor power Add
 Summary:  An image showing President Jimmy Carter's instructions on 2 December 1987 to operators at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station to "increase light-water breeder reactor power to 100%" (191). Carter issued the order from the White House in a ceremony attended by Secretary of Energy James Schlesinger, Admiral Hyman Rickover, and other Naval Reactors officials; it marked the beginning of routine operations at the Shippingport plant following its conversion to a breeder reactor. The core, which generated more fuel than it consumed, was composed of U-233 and Thorium. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 190-192. 
 Date:  02 December 1977 
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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5Title:  Nuclear analysis and performance of the Light Water Breeder Reator (LWBR) core power operations at Shippingport (LWBR Development Program) Add
 Summary:  This report, written by H.C. Hecker, analyzes the performance of the thorium oxide-uranium oxide Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core that was used in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station from 1977 to 1982. During this period, the Shippingport plant generated 1.7 billion net kilowatt hours of energy to the Duquesne Light Energy utility. Heckert notes that the core's design Effective Full Power Hours output of 18,000 was exceeded in the first three years of operation (at 18,298 EFPH). At this point, limits on reactor power and primary plant pressure and temperature were adopted to extend core life. The unique LWBR design, in which reactivity was controlled through the use of movable fuel assemblies instead of hafnium control rods, is noted by the author. In 1982, "the end of reactivity lifetime at a maximum power level of 80% was reached at about 27,100 EFPH with the 12 movable seed assemblies at the maximum withdrawn position" (3). Hecker also describes the core's breeding efficiency: "Fuel depletion calculations which approximated the actual power operations indicate that more fissile fuel was produced in the core than was consumed. The calculated final fissile fuel content is 1.3 percent greater than the initial fissile fuel inventory" (4). Both the core materials and reactivity control systems were "designed to minimize parasitic neutron losses," thus supporting the breeding process (5). The report includes a description and diagrams of the LWBR's core design, which used the seed-blanket arrangement employed in the original Shippingport core. Historian Francis Duncan describes the time commitments that Admiral Hyman Rickover and the Naval Reactors organization made to the development of a civilian nuclear power industry in the United States, through its technical oversight of the design, construction, and operation of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and later that of the Light Water Breeder Reactor core. The LWBR was installed in the existing Shippingport reactor pressure vessel and demonstrated breeding in a pressurized water reactor plant. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 190-231. 
 Date:   1984 
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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6Title:  Photographs: Written historical and descriptive data Add
 Summary:  This document provides a historical overview of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, which achieved criticality on December 2, 1957. It describes Admiral Hyman Rickover's role in the plant's design and development. In approaching plant design, the report notes Rickover's "conservative design philosophy" and emphasis on reactor safety (7). The station's first reactor design was a pressurized water reactor (PWR), with Rickover, his Naval Reactors organization, and Westinghouse drawing upon the lessons in the design and development of the S1W (Nautilus prototype) plant, also a PWR. The basics of the PWR's seed-blanket core design are described in the document, as well as innovative aspects of the Shippingport plant that were widely adopted in the commercial nuclear power industry, including the use of "reactor containment, a structure which housed in a series of large, interconnected, vapor-tight vessels all parts of the plant containing the reactor and primary system" (3). Also, "the choice of uranium dioxide and zircaloy tubing was crucial in the history of civilian power reactors. The materials proved so successful that they were widely adopted in the civilian power industry" (10). The document also describes the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core that was first used in operation in 1977: "Shippingport began operating on a thorium-uranium 233 core to demonstrate the feasibility of breeding in a water-cooled reactor; that is, producing more reactor fuel than was consumed" (3). The document concludes with a bibliographic essay that provides information on the Shippingport plant, including its construction, operation, and decommissioning. 
 Source:  http://lcweb2.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/pa/pa1600/pa1658/data/pa1658data.pdf 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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7Title:  Main coolant pump, lower section, at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station Add
 Summary:  A reactor coolant pump at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The pump circulated water (which served as both coolant and moderator in the pressurized water reactor plant) through the core and the steam generator. One centrifugal pump was installed in each of the plant's four reactor coolant loops. Each pump had two operating speeds, to save electrical power when the plant was operated at below 50% reactor power. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 15 and 31-32. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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8Title:  Lower section of plant pressurizer, Shippingport Atomic Power Station Add
 Summary:  The lower section of the pressurizer at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. In a pressurized water reactor plant, the pressurizer is used to maintain satisfactory operating pressure. Primary pressure in increased through the operation of the removable heating elements visible on the right side of the pressurizer. Pressure is reduced through a spray nozzle at the top of the unit. The pressurizer is connected to the primary coolant system through the surge line (entering the bottom of the pressurizer) and the spray line (entering at the top). During normal power operations, steam is present above the pressurizer's water volume. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 235-238. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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9Title:  Reactor vessel positioned on its side Add
 Summary:  The lower portion of the 264 ton reactor vessel, used for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The vessel is positioned on its side in Shippingport's fuel handling building prior to its installation in the plant. The reactor vessel housed the reactor's fuel assembly, control rods, and thermal shields. Pressurized water flows from each of the loops into the four inlet nozzles at the vessel's bottom; heated water flows to each of the loops from the four outlet nozzles at the top. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 63-69. 
 Date:  10 October 1956 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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10Title:  Thermal shields centered over reactor vessel Add
 Summary:  The thermal shield positioned above the Shippingport reactor vessel. The core's thermal shields consisted of two stainless steel cylinders which rested inside the vessel. The shields reduced the core's radiation and, thus, the heat generated in the reactor's pressure vessel. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 69-70. 
 Date:  11 April 1964 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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