http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification 720 Naval Reactors History Database (f1-subject=S1W) http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/search?f1-subject%3DS1W Results for your query: f1-subject=S1W Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Admiral Rickover just outside of the S1W hull entrance. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/003/003.html Admiral Hyman Rickover (at center of group) at a hull entrance for the Mark I, or S1W, reactor plant. The S1W (the Nautilus prototype) achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953; two months later, reactor power was used to drive the prototype's shaft. Rickover then ordered a continuous 100 hour run of the S1W propulsion plant that demonstrated beyond question the revolutionary impact that nuclear propulsion would have upon submarines. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/003/003.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Aerial view of the S1W prototype building. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/007/007.html An aerial view of the S1W prototype building, located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The S1W (or Mark I) plant was the world's first power reactor; it used pressurized water as both coolant and moderator. S1W served as the prototype plant for the USS Nautilus, and as a testing and training plant for the Naval Reactors program until 1989. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/007/007.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Atomic shield: A history of the United States Atomic Energy Commission. United States Atomic Energy Commission. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/029/029.pdf This chapter describes some early Naval Reactors-led development efforts in the context of other activities of the Atomic Energy Commission. In 1952, three development efforts were underway: S1W and S2W (Mark I and Mark II) design and construction; S1G (Mark A) design and construction; and, design work for a carrier reactor - an effort that evolved into the civilian reactor plant for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The carrier project in 1950-1952 was based on a breeder reactor design that would enable the AEC to meet three goals: Moving forward with large ship propulsion; increasing plutonium production; and, increasing electric power production. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/029/029.pdf Wed, 01 Jan 1969 12:00:00 GMT Atomic shield: A History of the United States Atomic Energy Commission. United States Atomic Energy Commission. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/030/030.pdf This chapter, from an official history of the AEC, provides a detailed account of the creation of the Naval Reactors program in the context of other activities of the Atomic Energy Commission. Authors Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan (who later cowrote the first official history of the Naval Reactors program) describe the push by Chief of the Bureau of Ships Admiral Earle Mills and Captain Hyman Rickover to create a joint Navy-Atomic Energy Commission program that would, working with private industry, lead the development of a nuclear submarine. One of the strengths of this study is that it shows how the Navy's demands were balanced by the AEC, given the Commission's other responsibilities and the competing demands that it was placing upon vendors like General Electric. The authors describe a series of events in 1948-1949, during which Westinghouse agreed to support the design of the Mark I (S1W) pressurized water reactor plant and General Electric was becoming more deeply engaged with naval nuclear prop... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/030/030.pdf Wed, 01 Jan 1969 12:00:00 GMT Monitoring equipment outside S1W hull. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/006/006.html Navy and civilian operators with monitoring equipment at the aft end of the S1W propulsion plant. The S1W's water brake, which absorbed the shaft power, can be seen directly behind the monitoring panel. The aft end of the hull is visible at left. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/006/006.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/010/010.html An aerial view of the Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NRF was the site of the S1W, A1W, and S5G prototypes. The site's Expended Core Facility remains open to support the processing of spent fuel from United States naval reactors. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/010/010.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Nuclear navy, 1946-1962. Richard G. Hewlett, Francis Duncan http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/112/112.pdf The foundational history of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, covering the period of the program's creation, under the leadership of Hyman G. Rickover, to 1962, by which time the United States Navy's fleet included nuclear-powered attack submarines, ballistic missile submarines, and surface ships. The program's leadership in support of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station is also chronicled. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/112/112.pdf Tue, 01 Jan 1974 12:00:00 GMT S1W propulsion plant - view from the floor. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/047/047.html View of the S1W prototype plant, looking aft to forward. The water tank on the right surrounded the reactor compartment. This design enabled Naval Reactors to assess the reflection of radiation from the core and primary system back into the hull. The cylindrical hull contained the engine rooms and a maneuvering room (the control room for the reactor and propulsion systems). The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. In June, the S1W plant successfully completed a 100 hour continuous run, illustrating that nuclear-powered submarines would revolutionize naval operations. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/047/047.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT S1W prototype plant - port side, stern view of plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/002/002.html The S1W (Nautilus) prototype plant, with the water brake for the shaft barely visible on the lower right. Under Hyman Rickover's leadership, the S1W (or Mark I) plant was built as both an engineering and a shipboard prototype, with the plant being assembled inside of a cylindrical hull. While this approach had disadvantages (for example, making it difficult to observe equipment operations in the hull's cramped spaces), it significantly reduced the time required to build the follow-up Mark II plant, on board the USS Nautilus. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/002/002.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT The S1W prototype, the world's first naval nuclear reactor plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/001/001.html The S1W plant, prototype for the USS Nautilus. Under the leadership of Hyman Rickover, Naval Reactors followed a concurrent design approach, with the design and construction of the S1W (then named Mark I) plant slightly leading the design and construction of the Nautilus. The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. Historians Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan noted that the S1W "was the world's first fully-engineered nuclear reactor capable of producing practical amounts of energy on a sustained and reliable basis" (186). The S1W was used to support plant testing and operator training for decades and was decommissioned in 1989. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/001/001.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT A worker inside the S1W hull during the plant's construction. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/008/008.html A contractor inside the cylindrical hull of the S1W plant, during its construction. The propulsion plant was built inside of a submarine hull less than 30 feet in diameter, enabling the lessons learned during its construction to guide the design and construction of the S2W plant, installed in the Nautilus. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/png/008/008.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT