http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification 720 Naval Reactors History Database (f1-subject=Nuclear engineering) http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/search?f1-subject%3DNuclear%20engineering Results for your query: f1-subject=Nuclear engineering Sun, 01 Jan 1956 12:00:00 GMT Babcock & Wilcox U-shell design steam generator. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/077/077.html One of the two Babcock & Wilcox Company U-shell steam generators being placed in a boiler room at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Each steam generator contained 921 stainless steel tubes, with an outside diameter of 3/4 inch. The U-shaped shells were 38 inches in diameter. It had two hemispherical heads with pipe connections through which primary coolant entered and exited the steam generator. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/077/077.html Wed, 12 Sep 1956 12:00:00 GMT Corrosion and wear handbook. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/078/078.pdf The introduction describes the handbook's purpose: "to accumulate and correlate the pertinent corrosion and wear information" that was the product of the first eight years in developing pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology for naval nuclear propulsion (3). The primary focus of the handbook is corrosion data related to the primary coolant system and steam generators in PWRs. The chapter provides a basic overview of PWR technology and emphasizes the importance of managing corrosion, noting that "only by closely controlling the amount of corrosion products in the primary system can this portion of the nuclear plant be made available for maintenance and repair within a reasonable period of time" after reactor shutdown (5). It includes summary information on stainless steel ("the major material of construction for water-cooled nuclear reactors") and carbon steel (5). http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/078/078.pdf Tue, 01 Jan 1957 12:00:00 GMT Defueling the S2G reactor. General Electric Company. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/036/036.pdf This report describes the defueling of Seawolf's S2G reactor plant at Electric Boat in January 1959. This defueling was accomplished as part of the Seawolf's conversion from the sodium-cooled, intermediate range S2G reactor to a pressurized water reactor (PWR), owing to problems with the sodium-cooled design. These serious problems, which plagued the S1G (or Mark A) prototype and S2G shipboard plants, demonstrated the clear superiority of the PWR design in submarine propulsion. The report describes the importance of training (for Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Electric Boat, and Navy personnel who worked on the defueling) consisting of lectures and dry-runs that took place in the fall of 1958. The dry-runs enabled workers to check the condition of refueling equipment and time estimates for the completion of maintenance steps. (The summary on page 18 describes the importance of dry-runs and recommends some best practices for accomplishing them.) The dry-runs also contributed to the success in minimizing... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/036/036.pdf Thu, 01 Jan 1959 12:00:00 GMT Documentation of Naval Reactors papers and presentations for the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) 2006. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/035/035.pdf This document contains information on the presentations and papers (24 in all) prepared by the Knolls and Bettis Atomic Power laboratories for the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) 2006 conference. These presentations describe the work of Naval Reactors and its contractor laboratories, Bettis and Knolls, for NASA's Project Prometheus, which was created to investigate the possible use of nuclear-powered systems for long duration space missions. At the time of the project, Naval Reactors was designated by the Department of Energy as the lead agency for the development of civilian space reactor systems. NR engaged the two contractor laboratories to investigate issues related to deep space reactors. The presentations cover topics such as reactor design, reactor instrumentation, and plant materials. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/035/035.pdf Sun, 01 Jan 2006 12:00:00 GMT Downcomers and risers piping, Shippingport secondary plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/078/078.html Piping for downcomers and risers in the B loop of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. These pipes connected the loop's Babcock & Wilcox U-shell steam generator with a steam drum, and through the steam drum with the plant's secondary system. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/078/078.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT An evaluation of data on zirconium-uranium alloys. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/061/061.pdf This document, compiled by Frank Rough of the Battelle Memorial Institute, contains a review of information on zirconium-uranium alloys. As noted in the introduction, "because of the similar properties and fabricational characteristics of these materials, the cladding of zirconium-uranium alloys with Zircaloy has proven to be very successful, with good metallurgical bonds being obtained" (7). This review addresses issues such as the corrosion of zirconium-uranium alloys in high temperature/high pressure systems and the impact of neutron irradiation upon these alloys. These and other issues are addressed and mapped to an extensive bibliography. As described by historians Thomas Hewlett and Francis Duncan in their book Nuclear Navy, Naval Reactors was deeply involved in the development of zirconium production in the United States, with the need to produce tonnage lots of zirconium to support early prototype and submarine reactor core construction. Beyond this, improvements in the technology were needed, s... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/061/061.pdf Sat, 01 Jan 1955 12:00:00 GMT Foster Wheeler straight tube steam generator. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/076/076.html One of the two Foster Wheeler straight tube steam generators being placed in a boiler room in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Each generator contained 2,096 stainless steel tubes, with each tube having an outer diameter of one-half inch. The heads of the steam generator each had 18 inch pipe connections to the secondary system. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/076/076.html Sun, 10 Aug 1958 12:00:00 GMT Fuel summary report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/037/037.pdf This report provides an in-depth analysis of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core installed in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station from 1977 to 1982. The core "was developed to prove the concept of a pressurized water breeder reactor" (iv). Its operation was successful, in that the "LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy" (1-1). The core's design was based on a Thorium/U-233 fuel cycle. The U-233 isotope was used because of its high neutron regeneration factor ("the average number of neutrons produced in fission for each neutron absorbed in fissile fuel") relative to U-235 and Pu-239 (3-1). The LWBR design was similar to the two earlier PWR core its use of a seed-blanket design for the reactor fuel. However, one difference between the LWBR and the PWR cores that preceded it in the Shippingport plant was the control mechanism: instead of Hafnium control rods, the breeder plant "was designed with a movable seed, which was raised and lowered to control neutron ... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/037/037.pdf Tue, 01 Jan 2002 12:00:00 GMT Lower section of plant pressurizer, Shippingport Atomic Power Station. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/070/070.html The lower section of the pressurizer at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. In a pressurized water reactor plant, the pressurizer is used to maintain satisfactory operating pressure. Primary pressure in increased through the operation of the removable heating elements visible on the right side of the pressurizer. Pressure is reduced through a spray nozzle at the top of the unit. The pressurizer is connected to the primary coolant system through the surge line (entering the bottom of the pressurizer) and the spray line (entering at the top). During normal power operations, steam is present above the pressurizer's water volume. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/070/070.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Main coolant pump, lower section, at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/069/069.html A reactor coolant pump at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The pump circulated water (which served as both coolant and moderator in the pressurized water reactor plant) through the core and the steam generator. One centrifugal pump was installed in each of the plant's four reactor coolant loops. Each pump had two operating speeds, to save electrical power when the plant was operated at below 50% reactor power. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/069/069.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Main coolant pump removed from operation. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/075/075.html A reactor coolant pump removed from operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Shippingport reactor used four reactor coolant pumps, one for each primary loop. The single-stage, leak proof centrifugal pump supported the flow of coolant in the primary system; in addition to the coolant flow through the pump, lower temperature water circulated within the pump to remove heat and lubricate the motor bearings. The pump was powered by a 2,300 volt electric motor that supported full-speed and half-speed operations. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/075/075.html Fri, 08 May 1964 12:00:00 GMT Materials performance in operating PWR steam generators. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/052/052.pdf This paper describes a challenge to the operation of pressurized water reactors on naval vessels: Steam generator U-tube leakage, primarily due to secondary chemistry problems. As described in the abstract, chemistry problems are centered in "those areas of the steam generators where limited coolant circulation and high heat flux have caused impurities to concentrate." Circulation problems (leading to cracking and corrosion) in Inconel U-tubes can be produced by "sludge deposits accumulated on the tube sheet or on tubing supports." In terms of prevention, the paper notes that "at the present time, all U.S. manufacturers of PWR's are recommending that their customers use an all-volatile treatment of the secondary coolant." It continues by providing water chemistry case studies on the three methods then used to maintain secondary chemistry: "A phosphate treatment, an all-volatile treatment, and a zero-solids treatment" (and the importance of moving from the first treatment method and attempting to reverse... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/052/052.pdf Wed, 01 Jan 1975 12:00:00 GMT Mechanical properties of Zircaloy-2. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/062/062.pdf To summarize: "Zircaloy-2 is a zirconium-tin alloy developed for use in water cooled nuclear reactors. It possesses good corrosion resistance to high-temperature water, excellent nuclear characteristics, and sufficiently good mechanical properties for use as a structural material in reactor cores and as a fuel element material" (1). The report analyzes changes in Zircaloy-2 properties caused by changes in operating conditions, including temperature, hydrogen concentration, and the presence of small notches in the material. As noted in the Hewlett/Duncan book, Nuclear Navy, "the study of zirconium alloys [in the first half of the 1950s] resulted in the development of a new material called Zircaloy-2, which was far superior to the material used in the [Mark I/S1W] core." http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/062/062.pdf Sun, 01 Jan 1961 12:00:00 GMT Naval reactors physics handbook. Volume 1, Selected basic techniques. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/032/032.pdf This chapter, written by physicist Alvin Radkowsky, summarizes the design challenges of submarine reactors in comparison with the natural uranium graphite reactors that had been designed and built during World War II. For example, Radkowsky describes the novelty ("close spacing") and design complexity of the control rod arrangement in PWRs (4). He also describes the parallel track of reactor development overseen by NR, with the intermediate range research supporting the S1G and S2G reactors performed by the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory; and, research supporting the Submarine Thermal Reactor (STR, or the S1W and S2W reactors) led by the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. He notes that while the intermediate range reactor approach had, by 1964, been abandoned in favor of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) design, that "fuel loading densities are often sufficiently high [so] that a substantial fraction of the fissions occurs above thermal neutron energies" (2). As a result, some research relating to the inte... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/032/032.pdf Wed, 01 Jan 1964 12:00:00 GMT Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and considerations with irradiation test performance in an international environment. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. Lockheed Martin. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/008/008.pdf This document describes the NRPCT's efforts to identify reactors worldwide for irradiation testing of materials expected to be included in a Prometheus reactor. The Experimental Fast Reactor JOYO in O-arai, Japan was identified as the best facility to support irradiation testing for the project (which was created to support space reactor development for solar exploration; the project ended in 2005). JOYO is a sodium-cooled Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR). Detailed planning information for reactor materials irradiation testing is included in the report. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/008/008.pdf Wed, 15 Feb 2006 12:00:00 GMT Pressure vessel and piping codes applicable to the PWR reactor plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/051/051.pdf This document provides information on standards compliance for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) installed in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station at the time of publication. The ASME standard, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, sections I and VIII, are referenced in the compliance summary, which maps code compliance to specific areas and components of the reactor plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/051/051.pdf Tue, 01 Jan 1957 12:00:00 GMT Pressurized-water naval nuclear propulsion system. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/012/012.html A simplified view of the major primary and secondary components in a naval nuclear propulsion plant. The fuel elements, containing Uranium-235 pellets, are enclosed in the reactor vessel. Pressurized water is used to moderate neutrons in the reactor core and serves as the heat transfer medium. Heated water moves to the steam generator, where the heat transfer takes place between the primary and secondary loops. The main coolant pump then returns the relatively cool water to the reactor core. The pressurizer enables primary loop pressure control through heaters (to increase pressure) and spray (to reduce pressure). The steam produced in the steam generator is used to drive turbines for propulsion and electrical power. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/012/012.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Project Prometheus Reactor Module final report. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/002/002.pdf This report describes the work of the Naval Reactors program's contractor laboratories - the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory - in NASA's Project Prometheus. Naval Reactors worked as NASA's partner in the design of a civilian space reactor for a 15-20 year mission. The first identified mission was the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). Five reactor designs were evaluated by Naval Reactors, with the direct gas Brayton plant deemed the most promising design. NR investigated a number of issues, including plant design, instrumentation and control, and core and plant materials. In performing this research, Naval Reactors determined that the existing state of reactor technology did not support the creation of a plant that would enable mission goals to be met. The Prometheus project was ended in 2005. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/002/002.pdf Sun, 01 Jan 2006 12:00:00 GMT Reactor compartment package characteristics for several submarine and surface plants. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/gif/003/003.html This graphic shows reactor compartment package characteristics for some submarine and surface ship reactor plants. After decommmissioning, the reactor plant(s) in a submarine or ship are removed and packaged for storage at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. The compartments are then shipped to and stored at the Hanford Site in Washington state. The primary system components housed inside the reactor compartment include: the reactor pressure vessel, reactor shielding, main coolant pumps, pressurizer system, and steam generators. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/gif/003/003.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Reactor core being lowered into pressure vessel. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/061/061.html The reactor core is lowered into the pressure vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Shippingport plant was "the first large-scale central station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electrical power." Based upon the demonstrated success of Naval Reactors in the development of pressurized water reactor plants, starting with the Mark I/S1W plant, Admiral Hyman Rickover was assigned responsibility for the Shippingport project by the Atomic Energy Commission. Consistent with the practice used for S1W's design and construction, the AEC contracted with Westinghouse Electric for the Shippingport's plant, with Naval Reactors again serving in its oversight role for the design, development, and construction activities at the Shippingport station. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/061/061.html Tue, 01 Jan 1957 12:00:00 GMT Reactor shielding design manual. United States Atomic Energy Commission. Division of Reactor Development. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/033/033.pdf This manual, edited by Theodore Rockwell of the early Naval Reactors group, is designed to provide an engineering overview of shielding design issues. The introductory chapter provides a pathfinder for the manual as a whole. Rockwell defines "shield engineering" as "the art of [lowering radiation levels] within specified limits of weight, volume, or cost" (4). He notes that neutron and gamma radiation are the primary focus of shield design and describes methods (such as the use of specific materials and shield compositions) used to achieve neutron and gamma-ray attenuation. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/033/033.pdf Sun, 01 Jan 1956 12:00:00 GMT Reactor vessel closure head. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/074/074.html The closure head is lowered to the top of the reactor vessel in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The closure head had 46 penetrations; 32 for the control rod drive mechanisms, along with refueling and instrumentation ports. The closure head was bolted and welded to the lower section of the reaction vessel to create a pressure-tight and leak-tight seal. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/074/074.html Mon, 20 Apr 1964 12:00:00 GMT Reactor vessel positioned on its side. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/071/071.html The lower portion of the 264 ton reactor vessel, used for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The vessel is positioned on its side in Shippingport's fuel handling building prior to its installation in the plant. The reactor vessel housed the reactor's fuel assembly, control rods, and thermal shields. Pressurized water flows from each of the loops into the four inlet nozzles at the vessel's bottom; heated water flows to each of the loops from the four outlet nozzles at the top. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/071/071.html Wed, 10 Oct 1956 12:00:00 GMT Request for Naval Reactors comment on Project Prometheus. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/007/007.pdf A formal request, from the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) to Naval Reactors requesting comment on the reactor safety requirements for NASA's Project Prometheus. Project Prometheus was created in 2003 to design reactors for long-duration space missions. The NRPCT, requesting the review, included engineers from Lockeed Martin, the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, and the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (the latter two being long-time contractors for Naval Reactors). The letter describes the team's primary goal: "Consistent with Naval Reactors program philosophy...no undue risk to the health and safety of workers, the public, or adverse effects to the environment should result from activities associated with the nuclear reactor of the Prometheus project." http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/007/007.pdf Thu, 28 Apr 2005 12:00:00 GMT Seed fuel assembly being removed from reactor vessel by an extraction crane. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/084/084.html A highly-enriched Uranium fuel element is removed from the Shippingport reactor core in 1960. Alvin Radkowsky, the chief physicist for Naval Reactors, "suggested the possibility of using a 'seed' of highly-enriched uranium surrounded by a much larger 'blanket' of natural uranium" (244). This core design approach offered several advantages, including ease of refueling (by replacing the seed elements), and was employed in the Shippingport reactor cores during the plant's operations, including the Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core that was used from 1977 to 1982. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/084/084.html Thu, 07 Jan 1960 12:00:00 GMT Shippingport operations with the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core (LWBR development program). http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/038/038.pdf This report provides a retrospective review of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. NR's central role in the creation of the LWBR is noted: "In the early 1960's, work done by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC - now the Department of Energy, DOE) laboratories under the direction of Naval Reactors showed it might be possible to develop a practical, self-sustaining breeder reactor, cooled and moderated with ordinary (light) water and fueled with uranium-233 and thorium" (1-1). The core's design was guided by two principles, "demonstrating typical utility operational capability while simultaneously producing more fissile fuel than is consumed" (2-1). A U-233/Thorium fuel cycle was used in the LWBR, primarily because "the average number of neutrons produced per atom of fissile fuel destroyed by neutron absorption is large enough for U-233 to permit breeding in a thermal reactor, whereas for either U-235 or Pu-238 this quantity is too small" (3-1). Innovations fo... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/038/038.pdf Wed, 01 Jan 1986 12:00:00 GMT The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor and Light-Water Breeder Reactor. Clayton, J.C. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/039/039.pdf This summary and outline, written by J.C. Clayton of the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, describes the history of the cores used at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. It notes that the design and construction of the Shippingport plant, the first commercial power reactor in the United States, was led by the Naval Reactors Branch, reporting to the Atomic Energy Commission. PWR core 1 used a seed-blanket arrangement, with "highly-enriched uranium alloy fuel assemblies" constituting the seed, and "natural uranium dioxide fuel rods" the blanket (3). For PWR core 1, Clayton notes that both regions were essential in maintaining a chain reaction. PWR core 2 employed several advances in reactor technology in order to increase power density and core lifetime. Unlike PWR core 1, the seed region of PWR 2 was capable of a self-sustaining reaction. Both PWR cores 1 and 2 employed Hafnium control rods in the seed region only. Clayton then summarizes the operation of the Shippingport reactor using the Light-Water ... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/039/039.pdf Fri, 01 Jan 1993 12:00:00 GMT Shippingport reactor pressure vessel. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/060/060.html The reactor pressure vessel for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station is unloaded from a rail car in the plant's fuel handling building. According to historians Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan, the Shippingport plant was "the world's first full-scale electrical generating plant using nuclear energy." In part owing to Hyman Rickover's success in building the Mark I (S1W) plant in a joint Atomic Energy Commission-Navy project, the AEC approved a proposal that had Rickover and his organization manage the design and construction of the Shippingport plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/060/060.html Wed, 10 Oct 1956 12:00:00 GMT Simplified view of S8G naval nuclear propulsion plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/gif/004/004.html A simplified view of the S8G reactor used to power the Ohio-class Trident ballistic missile submarines. The S8G plant's two turbines provide 60,000 shp (thermal power, shaft horsepower), approaching twice the power produced by the S6G plant used to drive the Los Angeles-class attack submarines. Admiral Hyman Rickover, head of Naval Reactors when the Trident submarine was designed in the early 1970s, supported the 60,000 shp plant, which contributed to the submarine's large size (560 feet long, with a submerged displacement of 18,700 tons). http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/gif/004/004.html Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (December 2, 1955 to January 12, 1956). Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Atomic Power Division. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/072/072.pdf This 1955 report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. In addition to Westinghouse's role in the design and construction of early naval nuclear propulsion plants such as the S1W and S2W (Nautilus prototype and shipboard plants) and the S5W reactor, Westinghouse was the primary contractor for design and construction of the civilian Shippingport Atomic Power Station plant. The report describes Westinghouse's progress (and work with other vendors) in the design and fabrication of reactor core and primary and secondary system components for the Shippingport plant. Section I-A-7 provides information, including photographs, on the installation of the "nuclear portion of the power plant" (11). http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/072/072.pdf Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (July 15 to August 26, 1954). Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Atomic Power Division. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/073/073.pdf This report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. Westinghouse was the lead contractor for the design and construction of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station's reactor plant, the first in the world to generate civilian power on a large scale. Owing in large part to the success of Hyman Rickover and the Naval Reactors program in directing the design and construction of the Mark I/S1W prototype plant, Naval Reactors served in an oversight role, again working with Westinghouse, for the creation of the Shippingport plant. The report describes progress as of August 1955 on the reactor control, reactor coolant, secondary, and auxiliary systems. It also describes the status of core design and fuel fabrication efforts. Section I-A-1 provides information on plant functional requirements. Section II describes developmental efforts for the Shippingport plant, such as fuel element research... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/073/073.pdf Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (May 5 to June 16, 1955). Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Atomic Power Division. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/074/074.pdf This report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. It describes the continued progress on the reactor and power plant at Shippingport, the first nuclear power plant in the world dedicated to the production of power for civilian use. Westinghouse worked under the direction of Naval Reactors in the design and construction of the plant and was the lead vendor for early naval reactor plants such as the S1W/S2W (Nautilus prototype and shipboard plants); the A1W/A2W (Enterprise prototype and shipboard plants); and, the S5W submarine fleet reactor. For that reason, sections of the report such as the description of fuel element failure instrumentation (page 23), are interesting, in that the information is applicable to pressurized water reactors in general. The "PWR Plant Parameters" section near the beginning of the report provides specific temperature, pressure, and power specifications for ... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/074/074.pdf Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (September 9 to October 20, 1955). Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Atomic Power Division. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/071/071.pdf This 1955 report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. At this time, Westinghouse was the leading designer and builder of naval nuclear propulsion plants, having constructed the Mark I (S1W prototype) and Mark II (Nautilus shipboard) reactors, and designed the S5W submarine fleet reactor. Additionally, Westinghouse was working under the direction of the Naval Reactors organization on the design and construction of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station plant, the first large-scale nuclear power plant that provided power for civilian use. The report describes Westinghouse.s progress (and work with other vendors) in the design and fabrication of reactor core and primary and secondary system components for the Shippingport plant. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/071/071.pdf Thu, 01 Jan 1970 12:00:00 GMT Thermal shield being lowered into Shippingport reactor vessel. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/073/073.html The thermal shield, which reduces the radiation that reaches the core vessel wall, being lowered into the Shippingport Atomic Power Station's reactor vessel. The shield rested on a support ledge inside the vessel. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/073/073.html Sat, 11 Apr 1964 12:00:00 GMT Thermal shields centered over reactor vessel. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/072/072.html The thermal shield positioned above the Shippingport reactor vessel. The core's thermal shields consisted of two stainless steel cylinders which rested inside the vessel. The shields reduced the core's radiation and, thus, the heat generated in the reactor's pressure vessel. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/jpeg/072/072.html Sat, 11 Apr 1964 12:00:00 GMT TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force: Status report and short-term recommendations. http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/049/049.pdf This document, known as NUREG-0578, was created by the Lessons Learned Task Force, an interdisciplinary group formed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident, which occurred on 28 March 1979. Of particular interest is the section on short-term recommendations, in which the task force proposes changes to operating procedures given the circumstances of the TMI-2 accident (a loss of feed in the secondary system, followed by a loss of coolant accident [LOCA] in the primary system of the pressurized water reactor, with resulting core damage). Several recommendations stand out. First, providing emergency power for critical services, such as pressurizer level indicator, pressurizer heaters, and power-operated control values. Second, performing periodic checking of primary system safety and relief valves. Third, and critically, ensuring that operators are trained to better diagnose "low reactor coolant level and inadequate core cooling using existing reactor... http://navalreactorshistorydb.info:8080/xtf/data/pdf/049/049.pdf Mon, 01 Jan 1979 12:00:00 GMT