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Naval Reactors[X]
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1Title:  Infrastructure - Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Add
 Summary:  This diagram describes the work of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, a joint Department of Energy and Navy program. Naval Reactors is "responsible for design, development, operation, and disposal of Naval nuclear propulsion plants." The program's training includes Naval Nuclear Power School (theoretical training) and prototype training, which is currently conducted on board moored ships and at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory's Kesselring site. NR oversees the work performed by public and private shipyards and contractual relationships with hundreds of specialized vendors. It also works with two major laboratories, Bettis and Knolls. This chart underscores the complexity of NR and the fact that its available infrastructure is managed by a relatively small central organization. 
 Source:  http://www.fas.org/man/gao/nsiad98001/c1.htm 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  GIF 
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2Title:  Shipyards in the United States that perform naval nuclear propulsion work, 2012 Add
 Summary:  Information on the nuclear-qualified shipyards that support the construction and maintenance of naval nuclear propulsion for the United States Navy. Links to Google Maps are provided for the six shipyard facilities. 
 Source:  http://nnsa.energy.gov/ourmission/poweringnavy 
 Date:   2012 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  HTML 
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3Title:  Aerial view of General Dynamics Electric Boat Add
 Summary:  An aerial photo of the General Dynamics Electric Boat yard in Groton, Connecticut. Electric Boat designed and built the first two nuclear submarines, the Nautilus and the Seawolf, and served as the lead yard for the early nuclear submarine classes, such as Skate and Skipjack. Electric Boat continues its pivotal role in submarine design and construction, including its lead yard responsibility for the USS Virginia (SSN-774) class of attack submarines. 
 Source:  http://www.sprol.com/2005/05/connecticut-submarines-part-2-general-dynamics-electric-boat-division/ 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 297-307. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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4Title:  Safeguarding of naval nuclear propulsion information: Unclassified portion Add
 Summary:  This document describes the handling requirements for NNPI, naval nuclear propulsion information, in light of current information technologies. It includes directions on determining classification and on marking classified documents. The instruction document includes a letter signed by Kirkland Donald, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, with implementation information. 
 Source:  www.fas.org/irp/doddir/navy/opnavinst/n9210_3.pdf 
 Date:  07 June 2010 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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5Title:  Statement of Admiral F.L. "Skip" Bowman, US Navy, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, before the House Committee on Science Add
 Summary:  A written statement submitted by Admiral Skip Bowman (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) to the House of Representatives following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003. Bowman testified on the program's "culture of safety" and the fact that safety is "mainstreamed" throughout the Naval Reactors program, from its research laboratories to contractor relationships, and to its operators in the fleet. He described the organizational structure of NR and its relatively small size (380 civilian and military employees in 2003), given the scope and complexity of the projects that it manages. Admiral Bowman also describes the importance of training in the program and his direct oversight role in this area. Bowman's statement followed work between NASA and Naval Reactors, a benchmarking exchange effort that identified practices in the Naval Reactors and submarine programs that would be potentially applicable to human space flight. 
 Source:  http://history.nasa.gov/columbia/house_reps.html 
 Date:  29 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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6Title:  Nuclear-powered ships: Accounting for shipyard costs and nuclear waste disposal plans Add
 Summary:  This 1992 GAO report describes accounting practices at shipyards that perform nuclear work, using the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington as the basis for the review. The report describes the higher costs for nuclear work, compared with non-nuclear work, at PSNS, attributing them to "the complex nature of nuclear work, which requires a greater level of services, and the higher cost of specially trained and skilled workers and specialized shipyard departments that support nuclear work, such as radiological control, nuclear engineering, nuclear planning, and nuclear quality assurance" (3). Appendix III includes information on the disposal of hazardous waste, including defueled reactor compartments from decommissioned nuclear-powered submarines. 
 Source:  http://www.gao.gov/products/NSIAD-92-256 
 Date:  01 July 1992 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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7Title:  United States Code Add
 Chapter title:  Title 50: Section 2511 
 Summary:  This section of the United States Code describes the administrative structure of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. This structure was defined in Executive Order 12344, which was signed by President Ronald Reagan on February 1, 1982, the day following Admiral Hyman Rickover's forced retirement as head of the program. The executive order maintained the basic structure of the program as it existed during Rickover's 35 year tenure, defining it as "an integrated program carried out by two organizational units, one in the Department of Energy and the other in the Department of the Navy" (488). The responsibilities of the Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion are stated in this section, along with the fact that either a military officer or civilian can be appointed to head the program. Finally, an important break with the Rickover era is also clearly stated in the executive order: an appointment as Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion is term-limited to eight years; this term can be shortened or extended by mutual consent of the Navy and the Department of Energy. 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:   2009 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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8Title:  Integrated nuclear power systems for future naval surface combatants Add
 Summary:  This hearing was held in the context of the United States Navy's currently use of surface nuclear propulsion only for its aircraft carriers. Expanding nuclear propulsion to smaller surface ships, such as the then-planned CG(X) class, is a compelling option, particularly given high oil prices. Dr. Delores Etter (Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Research, Development and Acquisition) provides an analysis of the pros and cons of nuclear-powered surface combatants, concluding that, based upon fuel costs and expected energy demands, "nuclear power should be considered for near-term application for [medium-size surface combatants]" (3). One limiter in expanding the application of nuclear propulsion, cited by Etter, is the fact that "the nuclear portions of any surface combatant would need to be done at one of the two shipyards authorized to do such work: Northrup Grumman Newport News and General Dynamics Electric Boat" - two yards that are heavily engaged in submarine and aircraft carrier work (3). In his statement, Admiral Kirkland Donald (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) provides an introduction to pressurized water reactor technology and his responsibilities. As a follow-up to Etter's point on the two nuclear shipyards, Donald asserted that both shipyards "are currently operating below their capacity" (7). One interesting discussion between Admiral Donald and Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington concerns nuclear waste disposal; Donald describes the program's waste disposal at the Idaho National Laboratory's Naval Reactors Facility (13). There is also a discussion between Admiral Donald and Rep. Gene Taylor of Mississippi regarding the fact that only two of the five shipyards building surface combatants are qualified for nuclear work. On this point, Admiral Paul Sullivan of the Naval Sea Systems Command notes that "we are building warships in modular sections now," suggesting that significant construction could be performed by non-nuclear yards (17). In summary, the hearing record provides a good overview of the current issues involved in expanding nuclear propulsion beyond aircraft carriers. 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:  01 March 2007 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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9Title:  Propulsion systems for Navy ships and submarines Add
 Summary:  This letter includes a July 2006 General Accounting Office review of naval propulsion systems. It includes details on some of the technical advances in nuclear propulsion, including "eliminat[ing] the need for refueling newer submarines, such as the Virginia class submarines" and significantly-reduced operator manpower requirements (2). It also describes technical advances in conventional propulsion systems. The letter summarizes the findings and limitations of the "quick look" report created by Naval Reactors in 2005, which attempted to fix the "fiscal break-even point" for the application of nuclear propulsion (2). Appended to the letter are some PowerPoint slides from a March 2005 GAO briefing to members of Congress on naval propulsion systems. 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:  06 July 2006 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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10Title:  NASA's organizational and management challenges in the wake of the Columbia disaster Add
 Summary:  This document describes a House Science Committee hearing on changes to NASA's organizational structure and culture following the loss of the space shuttle Columbia in 2003. Naval Reactors was one of several organizations identified as "model safety organizations" whose examples could be used to help guide changes at NASA (4). The prepared statement of Admiral Skip Bowman (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion), is included in the document. Bowman testified on the program's "culture of safety" and the fact that safety is "mainstreamed" throughout the Naval Reactors program, from its research laboratories to contractor relationships, and to its operators in the fleet (18). He described the organizational structure of NR and its relatively small size (380 civilian and military employees in 2003), given the scope and complexity of the projects that it manages. Admiral Bowman also describes the importance of training in the program and his direct oversight role in this area. Bowman's statement followed work between NASA and Naval Reactors, a benchmarking exchange effort that identified practices in the Naval Reactors and submarine programs that would be potentially applicable to human space flight. In the panel session, Admiral Bowman expanded on the organizational structure of NR, noting that he had 21 line managers at NR headquarters reporting directly to him in "one of the flattest organizations in this country, and certainly within the United States Government" (47). Within this structure, Bowman asserted, schedule pressure is not allowed to dominate the balance between schedule, costs, and safety. In a post-hearing response, Bowman described NR's hands-on involvement with safety in the program's reactor plants: "My staff and I are personally informed of or briefed on every significant naval nuclear propulsion plant problem; from this, we determine if additional causes need to be identified or if additional corrective actions (technical or administrative) need to be taken" (74). He listed Reactor Safeguards Examinations as a proactive way for NR to ensure that reactors are being safely operated. Admiral Bowman also described his dual military/civilian appointment; as an Assistant Secretary of Energy, the Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion has "the final say over whether a Reactor is safe to operate" (52). Another point of interest is the program's view towards dissenting opinions, whether it is from one of the prime contractor laboratories or from headquarters' staff. Admiral Bowman described an environment in which dissenting opinions are documented and factored into the Director's decision-making, and one in which "there cannot be any fear of reprisal for raising concerns or issues" (81). 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:  29 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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