Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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21Title:  Nuclear Power Training Unit, Charleston Add
 Summary:  The Nuclear Power Training Unit facility located at the Naval Weapons Station in Charleston, South Carolina. Graduates of Naval Nuclear Power School are assigned to qualify at a prototype plant in Charleston and in Ballston Spa, New York. The two prototypes at NPTU Charleston are moored submarines, both of which have S5W reactor plants. 
 Source:  http://www.oocities.org/matt_sutphen/nptu.htm 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S5W | USS Daniel Webster (MTS-626) | USS Sam Rayburn (MTS-635) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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22Title:  Main control console at Shippingport (looking south) Add
 Summary:  A view of the control room at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, with the reactor control panel on the left and the turbine control panel in the center. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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23Title:  HMS Dreadnought, first British nuclear submarine Add
 Summary:  The HMS Dreadnought, the first British nuclear-powered submarine. In both her overall design and propulsion plant, the Dreadnought mirrored the six United States submarines of the Skipjack class. The Dreadnought was powered by an S5W reactor; Westinghouse worked with the British manufacturer Rolls Royce on the construction of the propulsion plant. Electric Boat provided assistance to the Vickers-Armstrong Limited shipyard for the submarine's construction. 
 Source:  http://forummarine.forumactif.com/t5047-sous-marin-nucleaire-d-attaque-hms-dreadnought 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman. Atomic Submarines. London: Van Nostrand, 1963, pages 149-151. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S5W | HMS Dreadnought (S101) | UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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24Title:  USS California, D2G-powered guided missile cruiser Add
 Summary:  The USS California was the lead ship in the California-class of nuclear-powered guided missile cruisers (CGNs). The California's construction was funded in the 1967 shipbuilding program, which also included funding for the Nimitz, the second nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Historian Francis Duncan notes the importance of mandatory language inserted by the House Armed Services Committee in the funding of these two surface nuclear-powered vessels, following several years of resistance by Department of Defense officials, particularly Secretary Robert McNamara, to the expansion of the surface nuclear fleet. 
 Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USS_California_%28CGN-36%29.JPG 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, page 153. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  D2G | USS California (CGN-36) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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25Title:  Photographs: Written historical and descriptive data Add
 Summary:  This document provides a historical overview of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, which achieved criticality on December 2, 1957. It describes Admiral Hyman Rickover's role in the plant's design and development. In approaching plant design, the report notes Rickover's "conservative design philosophy" and emphasis on reactor safety (7). The station's first reactor design was a pressurized water reactor (PWR), with Rickover, his Naval Reactors organization, and Westinghouse drawing upon the lessons in the design and development of the S1W (Nautilus prototype) plant, also a PWR. The basics of the PWR's seed-blanket core design are described in the document, as well as innovative aspects of the Shippingport plant that were widely adopted in the commercial nuclear power industry, including the use of "reactor containment, a structure which housed in a series of large, interconnected, vapor-tight vessels all parts of the plant containing the reactor and primary system" (3). Also, "the choice of uranium dioxide and zircaloy tubing was crucial in the history of civilian power reactors. The materials proved so successful that they were widely adopted in the civilian power industry" (10). The document also describes the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core that was first used in operation in 1977: "Shippingport began operating on a thorium-uranium 233 core to demonstrate the feasibility of breeding in a water-cooled reactor; that is, producing more reactor fuel than was consumed" (3). The document concludes with a bibliographic essay that provides information on the Shippingport plant, including its construction, operation, and decommissioning. 
 Source:  http://lcweb2.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/pa/pa1600/pa1658/data/pa1658data.pdf 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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26Title:  The S1W prototype, the world's first naval nuclear reactor plant Add
 Summary:  The S1W plant, prototype for the USS Nautilus. Under the leadership of Hyman Rickover, Naval Reactors followed a concurrent design approach, with the design and construction of the S1W (then named Mark I) plant slightly leading the design and construction of the Nautilus. The S1W plant achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953. Historians Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan noted that the S1W "was the world's first fully-engineered nuclear reactor capable of producing practical amounts of energy on a sustained and reliable basis" (186). The S1W was used to support plant testing and operator training for decades and was decommissioned in 1989. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 164-165, 182-186. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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27Title:  S1W prototype plant - port side, stern view of plant Add
 Summary:  The S1W (Nautilus) prototype plant, with the water brake for the shaft barely visible on the lower right. Under Hyman Rickover's leadership, the S1W (or Mark I) plant was built as both an engineering and a shipboard prototype, with the plant being assembled inside of a cylindrical hull. While this approach had disadvantages (for example, making it difficult to observe equipment operations in the hull's cramped spaces), it significantly reduced the time required to build the follow-up Mark II plant, on board the USS Nautilus. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman, and Thomas B. Allen. Rickover: Controversy and Genius, a Biography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1984, pages 149-153. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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28Title:  Admiral Rickover just outside of the S1W hull entrance Add
 Summary:  Admiral Hyman Rickover (at center of group) at a hull entrance for the Mark I, or S1W, reactor plant. The S1W (the Nautilus prototype) achieved initial criticality on 30 March 1953; two months later, reactor power was used to drive the prototype's shaft. Rickover then ordered a continuous 100 hour run of the S1W propulsion plant that demonstrated beyond question the revolutionary impact that nuclear propulsion would have upon submarines. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Rockwell, Theodore. The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made a Difference. Lincoln, NE: IUniverse, 2002, pages 133-137 and 140-143. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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29Title:  Monitoring equipment outside S1W hull Add
 Summary:  Navy and civilian operators with monitoring equipment at the aft end of the S1W propulsion plant. The S1W's water brake, which absorbed the shaft power, can be seen directly behind the monitoring panel. The aft end of the hull is visible at left. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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30Title:  Aerial view of the S1W prototype building Add
 Summary:  An aerial view of the S1W prototype building, located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The S1W (or Mark I) plant was the world's first power reactor; it used pressurized water as both coolant and moderator. S1W served as the prototype plant for the USS Nautilus, and as a testing and training plant for the Naval Reactors program until 1989. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_08.pdf 
 Reference:  Rockwell, Theodore. The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made a Difference. Lincoln, NE: IUniverse, 2002, pages 117-145. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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