Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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1Title:  Shipyards in the United States that perform naval nuclear propulsion work, 2012 Add
 Summary:  Information on the nuclear-qualified shipyards that support the construction and maintenance of naval nuclear propulsion for the United States Navy. Links to Google Maps are provided for the six shipyard facilities. 
 Source:  http://nnsa.energy.gov/ourmission/poweringnavy 
 Date:   2012 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  HTML 
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2Title:  Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional budget request: National Nuclear Security Administration Add
 Summary:  This National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) FY 2013 budget request includes a request of 1.1 billion dollars for Naval Reactors, a less than one percent increase over the FY 2012 request. The appropriations summary notes that nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and submarines currently comprise over 40 percent of the nation's combatant vessels. It also describes several high-level strategic goals: "Continued execution of the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine replacement project, land-based prototype refueling overhaul, and the recapitalization of NR's spent fuel handling infrastructure" (9). One of the key accomplishments of Naval Reactors in FY 2012 related to Virginia-class Block II submarines, including the commissioning of the USS California (SSN-781) and the construction of two additional Block II subs, the USS Mississippi (SSN-782) and the USS Minnesota (SSN-783). The request also describes significant activities in the spent fuel processing area for aircraft carrier reactors in the past year, including delivery of the M-290 spent fuel shipping containers and upgrades to the Expended Core Facility to support the M-290 containers; these measures show the "continued preparations for the inactivation and disposal of CVN-65 (USS Enterprise), the first-ever nuclear powered aircraft carrier decommissioning" (481). Key milestones planned for FY 2013 are continued reactor plant design work for the Gerald R. Ford-class of super carriers (to 98 percent completion) and the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine replacement (to 23 percent completion). Finally, the interrelationship between NR and other NNSA programs is illustrated by the discussion of the Uranium Processing Facility at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This facility "provide[s] uranium as feedstock for fuel for naval reactors" (244). 
 Source:  http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/budget 
 Date:   2012 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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3Title:  USS Mississippi, Virginia-class attack submarine, during Alpha trials Add
 Summary:  The USS Mississippi during its pre-commissioning trials in April 2012. The Mississippi was completed and delivered to the Navy almost a year ahead of schedule. The submarine was completed in 62 months, compared with the 86 months that it took to complete the lead boat in the class, the USS Virginia. The sub was constructed by two private yards, General Dynamics Electric Boat and Newport News Shipbuilding, working in partnership with one another. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=125175 
 Date:  07 April 2012 
 Subject(s):  S9G | USS Mississippi (SSN-782) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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4Title:  Statement of Thomas P. D.Agostino, Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy on the fiscal year 2012 nuclear security posture and the President's budget request before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, Senate Armed Services Committee Add
 Summary:  The written statement of Thomas D'Agostino, Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration, on the administration's budget request for FY 2012. This statement includes supporting information for the Naval Reactors budget request, which was 1.2 billion dollars, an increase of nearly eight percent from the previous fiscal year. D'Agostino identifies strategic development areas as support for the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine replacement, noting that 'providing the Ohio class replacement a life-of-the-ship reactor core will require substantial advances in manufacturing technology to provide new cladding and a new fuel system" (4). A second strategic area is the "Spent Fuel Handling Recapitalization Project (SFHP), which will replace the over 50-year old Expended Core Facility (ECF) as the location for naval spent nuclear fuel receipt, inspection, dissection, packaging, and secure dry storage" (4). Finally, the budget tables show how the request for Naval Reactors fits within the larger NNSA budget request. 
 Source:  http://armed-services.senate.gov/statemnt/2011/03%20March/DAgostino%2003-30-11.pdf 
 Date:  30 March 2012 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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5Title:  Navy Ohio replacement (SSBN[X]) ballistic missile submarine program: Background and issues for Congress Add
 Summary:  This report, written by naval affairs specialist Ronald O'Rourke, describes the Ohio ballistic missile submarine replacement (ORP) or SSBN(X) program. The report's table 1, on page 5, shows how SSBN(X) fits with the four predecessor classes of U.S. ballistic missile submarines. O'Rourke notes that "unlike the [S8G] Ohio-class design, which requires a mid-life nuclear refueling, the SSBN(X) is to be equipped with a life-of-the-ship nuclear fuel core (a nuclear fuel core that is sufficient to power the ship for its entire expected service life" (11). Additionally, to achieve noise reduction, "the SSBN(X) is to be equipped with an electric-drive propulsion plant, as opposed to the mechanical-drive propulsion plant used on other Navy submarines" (15). O'Rourke's report provides information on issues that will have to be considered by Congress for the SSBN(X) program, such as the number of SLBMs in each submarine. This section quotes Admiral Kirkland Donald, Naval Reactors head in support of the decision to reduce the number of missile tubes in the SSBN(X) from 20 to 16 as a cost savings measure, "because what that allowed us to do was to down rate...the propulsion power that was needed" for the smaller submarine (17). 
 Source:  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/R41129.pdf 
 Date:  05 April 2012 
 Subject(s):  SSBN(X) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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6Title:  Statement of Admiral Kirkland Donald, Director, Naval Reactors, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy on the fiscal year 2013 President's budget request before the Senate Armed Service Committee, Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Add
 Summary:  Admiral Kirkland Donald summarizes the Naval Reactors budget request for FY 2013. Adm. Donald describes important program accomplishments for FY 2012. This includes progress in reactor design for the replacement class for Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines, "including sufficient completion of design and manufacturing development of core materials to support the 2012 core materials decision" (1). He notes that full funding for this design work is essential: "vital to minimizing risk and cost during component procurement and ship construction" (3). In describing the FY 2013 request, Donald emphasizes the program's responsibility "for complete lifecycle support for every nuclear-powered warship, from construction through inactivation" (2). This is epitomized by the major projects described by Adm. Donald, including "the refueling overhaul for the S8G land-based prototype reactor, the design of the Ohio replacement reactor plant, and recapitalization of [the] naval spent nuclear fuel infrastructure" (2). He also describes the benefits of the life-of-the-ship core that will be installed in the successor to the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines, one being the ability to reduce the number of submarines procured by the federal government. Finally, Donald notes the importance of the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory (which has been in operation for more than 50 years). Due to fiscal limits imposed by the Budget Control Act, Naval Reactors will be submitting a revised plan for the recapitalization of infrastructure at the facility. 
 Source:  http://armed-services.senate.gov/statemnt/2012/03%20March/Donald%2003-14-12.pdf 
 Date:  14 March 2012 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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7Title:  Amended notice of intent to revise the scope of an Environmental Impact Statement for the recapitalization of infrastructure supporting naval spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  In this May 2012 Federal Register announcement, "the DOE Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) announce[d] its intent to revise the scope to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Recapitalization of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling and Examination Facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)" (27448). The announcement invited comments for a revised and narrower scope for recapitalization (compared with that described in a July 2010 Federal Register announcement). It describes the responsibilities of the Naval Reactors organization ("all aspects of U.S. Navy nuclear power and propulsion," including the management of spent nuclear fuel removed from naval reactor cores during defueling and refueling operations") (27448). It provides a high-level overview of how the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at the INL supports the program's spent fuel handling efforts, describes issues with facilities aging, and includes a short description of ECF recapitalization efforts. As noted, comments are solicited on the recapitalization of spent fuel handling facilities, with three alternative scenarios being considered, including the construction of a new spent fuel handling facility, upgrade of existing facilities at the ECF, and maintenance of existing capabilities. 
 Source:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-10/pdf/2012-11292.pdf#page=1 
 Date:  10 May 2012 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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8Title:  The USS Seawolf sodium-cooled reactor Add
 Summary:  The text of a May 2012 speech by Eric Loewen of the American Nuclear Society, which focused on the sodium cooled intermediate range reactors designed and developed by General Electric for naval propulsion. While there are some errors in the text, Loewen describes sodium cooled reactor technology and components such as electromagnetic pumps. He provides some unique insights into the construction of the S1G and S2G naval plants. Similar to the Manhattan Engineer District project, the development of naval nuclear propulsion followed a parallel path with the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), developed by Westinghouse and the sodium cooled, Submarine Intermediate Rector (SIR), developed by General Electric. Loewen notes that the SIR offered two important advantages: "the sodium cooled knowledge base was further advanced than the PWR, and the sodium cooled reactor did have higher steam cycle efficiency" (3). He also describes some of the weaknesses of the SIR reactor, including the use of 347 stainless steel (347SS) in the superheaters and the "adverse affects of sodium" upon 347SS. Bypassing the superheaters led to higher-than-expected uranium depletion as the plant operated with lower steam temperatures and pressures (5). In reviewing the Soviet navy's use of liquid metal cooled plants, Loewen notes another weakness of the SIR: external heaters must keep the primary loop warm during reactor shutdown periods in order to keep the coolant from solidifying. Errors include the power rating of the Shippingport civilian power plant (initial rating, 60 MW) and the moderator for the S1G and S2G plants (which were beryllium, not carbon). 
 Source:  http://www.new.ans.org/about/officers/docs/seawolf_sfr_sea_story_051712.pdf 
 Date:  17 May 2012 
 Subject(s):  S1G | S2G | USS Seawolf (SSN-575) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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