Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
Favorites (0)
Search:
2011 in date [X]
rss icon RSS | Modify Search | New Search | nrhdb Home
Results:  9 itemsBrowse by Facet | Title
Sorted by:  
Page: 1
Subject
Date
collapse2011
expand12 (1)
expand09 (1)
expand07 (1)
expand04 (1)
expand01 (1)
Type
Text (6)
Image (3)
1Title:  Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional budget request: National Nuclear Security Administration Add
 Summary:  The Naval Reactors fiscal year 2012 budget request is included as part of the larger National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) request. Several priority efforts are described in detail, including replacing the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and refueling of the S8G prototype, which was used for component testing for the later Virginia- and Seawolf-class submarines. Additionally, funding is requested for the upgrading of the spent fuel processing infrastructure at the Idaho National Laboratory's Naval Reactors Facility; the request notes that "all spent naval nuclear fuel from Navy shipyards is shipped to [NRF] for examination and disposal" (439). The needed upgrades include processing water pools, cranes, and fuel examination equipment. The FY 2012 request is for $1.07 billion dollars, an increase from NR's FY 2010 appropriation of 877 million dollars. 
 Source:  http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/budget 
 Date:   2011 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
2Title:  The cost-effectiveness of nuclear power for Navy surface ships Add
 Summary:  This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) study deals with a point of tension that's existed between the Executive Branch and Congress for decades, the application of nuclear propulsion in the surface fleet. Currently, only United States Navy aircraft carriers are nuclear-powered and "its other surface combatants are powered by engines that use conventional petroleum-based fuels" (1). The study compares the costs of nuclear and non-nuclear surface combatant vessels based upon the CBO's current projection of oil prices in the coming decades, along with projections both under and over this projection. Taking into account construction and operating costs, the CBO then calculates "break-even" points for different categories of ships; that is, the price of oil reaches a level so that the added costs associated with nuclear propulsion are offset (8). 
 Source:  http://www.cbo.gov/doc.cfm?index=12169 
 Date:   2011 
 Subject(s):  DDG(X) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
3Title:  Draft environmental assessment on the disposal of naval reactors plants from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Add
 Summary:  This document provides information on the preferred disposal plan for the eight defueled reactor plants in the USS Enterprise, the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. It lays out the timeline for Enterprise's deactivation; it "is expected to enter dry dock at Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia for inactivation in 2013. Defueling will be conducted at Newport News Shipbuilding. Inactivation is expected to be complete in about 2017 or 2018" (1-1). At that point, Enterprise will be towed to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) for removal of the already-defueled reactor compartments. The compartments will be packaged and shipped to the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The actual shipment of the packages to Hanford is estimated to occur between 2023 and 2027. The assessment includes information on the estimated exposure required for the preparation and packaging of the compartments (about 300 rem of collective radiation exposure") (2-2). Page 2-6 includes a diagram that shows the locations of the eight reactor compartments on board the Enterprise, which are paired in four propulsion plants. The assessment describes the methodology for transporting the packages to Hanford and describes transport challenges and accident scenarios. The document also describes an interim "no-action alternative" to the preferred plan: placing the Enterprise in waterborne storage at the PSNS & IMF facility. This alternative has the disadvantage of "only delay[ing] ultimate permanent disposal" (2-17). 
 Source:  http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/EA-1889-DEA-2011.pdf 
 Date:   2011 
 Subject(s):  A2W | USS Enterprise (CVN-65) | Hanford Site | Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
4Title:  Occupational radiation exposure from U.S. naval nuclear plants and their support facilities Add
 Summary:  As noted in the summary, this report describes "radiation exposures to Navy and civilian personnel monitored for radiation associated with U.S. naval nuclear propulsion plants" (1). Most of the exposure comes "from inspection, maintenance, and repair inside the reactor compartment [following reactor shutdown]. The major source of this radiation is cobalt-60 deposited inside the piping systems" (5). Additionally, "the radiation exposures in this report are almost entirely from gamma radiation," given the low level of neutron radiation following shutdown (9). The report describes the high priority placed by the Naval Reactors organization on reducing exposure, noting that "shield design criteria establishing radiation levels in various parts of each nuclear-powered ship are personally approved by the Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion" (5). It provides an in-depth summary of personnel dosimetry used in the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program throughout its history. The move from calcium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) to lithium fluoride TLDs began in 2006 in shipyards that perform nuclear propulsion work; the transition to lithium fluoride TLDs throughout the program, including the fleet, was completed in 2010. With lithium fluoride dosimeters, it's possible, using a methodology described in the report, to estimate background radiation sources and subtract background exposure from the "program sources of radioactivity" received by shipboard personnel (8). As a result of the move to lithium fluoride TLDs, the total fleet exposure markedly decreased in 2010 (compared with 2009), as described in the summary. Finally, the report describes the radiological controls training required for naval personnel in the nuclear propulsion program and for workers in shipyards supporting nuclear construction and maintenance work. In summary, this report provides a concise and informative study of the program's approach to radiation exposure, both in the past and current practices, including information on radiation sources, dosimetry, required physical examinations, and training. 
 Source:  http://nnsa.energy.gov/sites/default/files/nnsa/02-12-multiplefiles/NT-11-2%20FINAL.pdf 
 Date:   2011 
 Subject(s):  Health physics | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
5Title:  USS Abraham Lincoln being replenished at sea Add
 Summary:  The USS Abraham Lincoln in an underway replenishment with the USNS Guadalupe (center) and the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (left). The Abraham Lincoln is the fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier and was constructed by Newport News Shipbuilding. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=107850 
 Date:  26 September 2011 
 Subject(s):  A4W | USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
6Title:  Management of key technologies in the UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme Add
 Summary:  Presentation slides created by Christopher Palmer (Assistant Chief Engineer of Rolls-Royce Submarines) describing technology management in the United Kingdom's Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme. Slide two provides the programme timeline. The first UK nuclear-powered submarine, the HMS Dreadnought, was powered by an S5W reactor and launched in 1960. The HMS Valiant, launched in 1966, was the first UK submarine powered by a Rolls-Royce pressurized water reactor plant. Both the UK and US programs are focused on building submarines that do not require refueling; slide 3 describes Rolls-Royce's Core H design, which achieves this goal. Slide 4 notes that future UK ballistic missile submarines will be powered by a next-generation plant, PWR3, which represents "a significant design evolution for the UK NNPP." In slide 5, Palmer describes the unique role of the UK NNPP in technology management, given its independent technical development and the depressed state of civilian nuclear power in the UK. He gives three examples in which the programme has taken the lead management role: "reactor core and plant performance analysis, validation and verification; major reactor plant component design; and, high integrity electrical design." Like its US counterpart (with its resources like the Bettis and Knolls laboratories), the UK NNPP has "dedicated infrastructure" that Palmer cites on slide 6. He continues by describing the collaborative efforts between the US and UK naval nuclear propulsion programs on slide 7, including the ability of both sides to gain an independent review of design approaches. In slides 10-12, Palmer describes programme challenges. In terms of decommissioned vessels, he notes that "current NNPP practice is afloat storage of defueled and decommissioned vessels (currently 17)" and that this capacity will be exhausted by 2020. This is contrast to the US approach of removing defueled reactor compartments and transporting them for storage at the Hanford Site; in part, this approach is a product of the larger number of decommissioned US nuclear submarines and ships. 
 Source:  http://csis.org/images/stories/poni/111201_Palmer.pdf 
 Date:  01 December 2011 
 Subject(s):  UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
7Title:  Navy SSBN(X) ballistic missile submarine program: Background and issues for Congress Add
 Summary:  This Congressional Research Service report, written by naval affairs specialist Ronald O'Rourke, focuses on cost issues for the United States Navy's next-generation of ballistic missile submarines, the SSBN(X). Current plans call for the design and construction of twelve SSBN(X) submarines, with the first to be procured in FY 2019. The SSBN(X) is the replacement class for Ohio-class Trident ballistic missile submarines. The report identifies oversight issues for Congress. Given the expected costs of the SSBN(X) submarines, O'Rourke emphasizes that "decisions that Congress makes on the SSBN(X) program could substantially affect U.S. military capabilities and funding requirements, and the U.S. shipbuilding industrial base" (1). In terms of the reactor plant, the report notes that SSBN(X) boats will have an installed core capable of powering the submarine for its entire expected service life of 40 years. Thus, no mid-life refueling (performed for Ohio-class submarines) will be required. O'Rourke also describes options for SSBN(X) construction, given the fact that only two shipyards in the United States are currently qualified to build nuclear submarines: General Dynamics/Electric Boat (GN/EB) and Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS). Note 64 (23-24) provides information on the shared construction arrangement between the two yards for Virginia-class submarines, along with the costs and benefits of this joint arrangement 
 Source:  http://opencrs.com/document/R41129/ 
 Date:  22 April 2011 
 Subject(s):  SSBN(X) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
8Title:  USS Enterprise in the Atlantic Add
 Summary:  The USS Enterprise at sea in 2011. The Enterprise had her final deployment in 2012 and was deactivated in 2013. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=96471 
 Date:  17 January 2011 
 Subject(s):  A2W | USS Enterprise (CVN-65) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
9Title:  USS Enterprise and USS Dwight D. Eisenhower in 2011 Add
 Summary:  The USS Enterprise (foreground) and the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower off the Virginia coast, as Enterprise returns from a six-month deployment. The Enterprise was deactivated in 2013. The Nimitz-class carrier Eisenhower, powered by two A4W reactors, was commissioned in 1977, 16 years after the Enterprise entered service. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=104147 
 Date:  14 July 2011 
 Subject(s):  A2W | A4W | USS Enterprise (CVN-65) | USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find

nrhdb Home