Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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1Title:  Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional budget request: National Nuclear Security Administration Add
 Summary:  This budget request provides an update on Naval Reactors activities and information on NR's future goals. The FY 2008 budget request for Naval Reactors was approximately $808 million. One of the described development areas is the reactor for the CVN 21 (the A1B reactor): "The new high-energy reactor design...represents a critical leap in capability" (531). The A1B reactor will have "nearly three times the electric plant generating capability" compared with the Nimitz-class A4W plants, and will require only half the number of plant operators (531). The request also has information on two reactor core development paths: Transformational Technology Core (TTC) and the use of fuel from nuclear weapons programs. A detailed justification is also included, describing the work of divisions within Naval Reactors. Developments to the A1B reactor are prominent across divisions, including reactor instrumentation and control rod drive mechanism design and development. 
 Source:  http://www.cfo.doe.gov/budget/08budget/Content/Volumes/Vol_1_NNSA.pdf 
 Date:   2007 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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2Title:  Mobilis in mobile: History of the U.S.S. Nautilus Add
 Summary:  Slides from a presentation by Andy Rogulich of the North American Jules Verne Society at the organization's 2007 conference. Rogulich describes the history of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) and compares her with Verne's fictional Nautilus in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. Rogulich's comparison of attributes of the USS Nautilus and Verne's Nautilus (page 16) is particularly interesting. He describes his visit to the Historic Ship Nautilus and the fact that a signed first edition of Verne's "Twenty Thousand Leagues" is displayed on board the Nautilus museum. 
 Source:  http://www.najvs.org/meetings/meet2K7/index.shtm 
 Date:  08 July 2007 
 Subject(s):  S2W | USS Nautilus (SSN-571) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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3Title:  Integrated nuclear power systems for future naval surface combatants Add
 Summary:  This hearing was held in the context of the United States Navy's currently use of surface nuclear propulsion only for its aircraft carriers. Expanding nuclear propulsion to smaller surface ships, such as the then-planned CG(X) class, is a compelling option, particularly given high oil prices. Dr. Delores Etter (Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Research, Development and Acquisition) provides an analysis of the pros and cons of nuclear-powered surface combatants, concluding that, based upon fuel costs and expected energy demands, "nuclear power should be considered for near-term application for [medium-size surface combatants]" (3). One limiter in expanding the application of nuclear propulsion, cited by Etter, is the fact that "the nuclear portions of any surface combatant would need to be done at one of the two shipyards authorized to do such work: Northrup Grumman Newport News and General Dynamics Electric Boat" - two yards that are heavily engaged in submarine and aircraft carrier work (3). In his statement, Admiral Kirkland Donald (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) provides an introduction to pressurized water reactor technology and his responsibilities. As a follow-up to Etter's point on the two nuclear shipyards, Donald asserted that both shipyards "are currently operating below their capacity" (7). One interesting discussion between Admiral Donald and Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington concerns nuclear waste disposal; Donald describes the program's waste disposal at the Idaho National Laboratory's Naval Reactors Facility (13). There is also a discussion between Admiral Donald and Rep. Gene Taylor of Mississippi regarding the fact that only two of the five shipyards building surface combatants are qualified for nuclear work. On this point, Admiral Paul Sullivan of the Naval Sea Systems Command notes that "we are building warships in modular sections now," suggesting that significant construction could be performed by non-nuclear yards (17). In summary, the hearing record provides a good overview of the current issues involved in expanding nuclear propulsion beyond aircraft carriers. 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:  01 March 2007 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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