Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
Favorites (0)
Search:
2003 in date [X]
rss icon RSS | Modify Search | New Search | nrhdb Home
Results:  8 itemsBrowse by Facet | Title
Sorted by:  
Page: 1
Subject
Date
collapse2003
expand10 (4)
expand07 (1)
expand04 (1)
Type
Text (5)
Image (3)
1Title:  Packaged, defueled submarine reactor compartments at the Hanford Site Add
 Summary:  The defueled and packaged reactor compartments removed from decommissioned submarines are stored in trench 94 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The compartments are currently stored in open dry storage and will eventually be buried in the trench. This storage is the final step in the Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP), which handles the disposal of decommissioned nuclear vessels. 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08637.htm 
 Date:   2003 
 Subject(s):  Hanford Site | Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
2Title:  National Nuclear Security Administration: Executive summary, FY 2004 Congressional budget request Add
 Summary:  This budget request describes the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), which was created in 2000 and oversees the Office of Naval Reactors. The document has detailed budget information for Naval Reactors facilities for the 2002 and 2003 fiscal years, and information on requests for FY 2004. The Transformational Technology Core (TTC) Pressurized Water Reactor ("a new design reactor core") is mentioned in the Naval Reactors summary (12). 
 Source:  http://www.cfo.doe.gov/budget/04budget/content/NNSAADM/NNSASUM.pdf 
 Date:   2003 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
3Title:  Stern view of the USS Enterprise Add
 Summary:  Stern view of USS Enterprise (CVN-65), which is powered by eight A2W reactors and four propulsion plants/shafts. The Enterprise is shown during an ordnance onload in the Atlantic Ocean. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=11480 
 Date:  31 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  A2W | USS Enterprise (CVN-65) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
4Title:  USS Cheyenne - last Los Angeles-class nuclear submarine Add
 Summary:  The USS Cheyenne, the last Los Angeles-class submarine, pulls into port in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii following a deployment. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=7025 
 Date:  24 April 2003 
 Subject(s):  S6G | USS Cheyenne (SSN-773) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
5Title:  NASA/Navy Benchmarking Exchange (NNBE): Naval Reactors safety assurance Add
 Summary:  As noted in the Executive Summary, "the NASA/Navy Benchmarking Exchange (NNBE) was undertaken to identify practices and procedures and to share lessons learned in the Navy's submarine and NASA's human space flight programs" (iv). NASA benchmarked Naval Reactors because of its "high reliability...provid[ing] the most meaningful comparison to NASA's human-rated space flight program" (4). A number of principles developed by the program's first director, Hyman G. Rickover, are analyzed, including the importance of a flat organizational structure that supports informed dissent; responsibility through ownership of a job, longevity, and technical expertise; and, the need for embedding safety principles in all aspects of a program's work. 
 Source:  http://www.worldcat.org/title/nasanavy-benchmarking-exchange-nnbe-volume-ii-progress-report-naval-nuclear-submarine-safety-assurance/oclc/52891042 
 Date:  15 July 2003 
 Subject(s):  Reactor safety | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
6Title:  Statement of Admiral F.L. "Skip" Bowman, US Navy, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, before the House Committee on Science Add
 Summary:  A written statement submitted by Admiral Skip Bowman (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) to the House of Representatives following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003. Bowman testified on the program's "culture of safety" and the fact that safety is "mainstreamed" throughout the Naval Reactors program, from its research laboratories to contractor relationships, and to its operators in the fleet. He described the organizational structure of NR and its relatively small size (380 civilian and military employees in 2003), given the scope and complexity of the projects that it manages. Admiral Bowman also describes the importance of training in the program and his direct oversight role in this area. Bowman's statement followed work between NASA and Naval Reactors, a benchmarking exchange effort that identified practices in the Naval Reactors and submarine programs that would be potentially applicable to human space flight. 
 Source:  http://history.nasa.gov/columbia/house_reps.html 
 Date:  29 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
7Title:  NASA's organizational and management challenges in the wake of the Columbia disaster Add
 Summary:  This document describes a House Science Committee hearing on changes to NASA's organizational structure and culture following the loss of the space shuttle Columbia in 2003. Naval Reactors was one of several organizations identified as "model safety organizations" whose examples could be used to help guide changes at NASA (4). The prepared statement of Admiral Skip Bowman (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion), is included in the document. Bowman testified on the program's "culture of safety" and the fact that safety is "mainstreamed" throughout the Naval Reactors program, from its research laboratories to contractor relationships, and to its operators in the fleet (18). He described the organizational structure of NR and its relatively small size (380 civilian and military employees in 2003), given the scope and complexity of the projects that it manages. Admiral Bowman also describes the importance of training in the program and his direct oversight role in this area. Bowman's statement followed work between NASA and Naval Reactors, a benchmarking exchange effort that identified practices in the Naval Reactors and submarine programs that would be potentially applicable to human space flight. In the panel session, Admiral Bowman expanded on the organizational structure of NR, noting that he had 21 line managers at NR headquarters reporting directly to him in "one of the flattest organizations in this country, and certainly within the United States Government" (47). Within this structure, Bowman asserted, schedule pressure is not allowed to dominate the balance between schedule, costs, and safety. In a post-hearing response, Bowman described NR's hands-on involvement with safety in the program's reactor plants: "My staff and I are personally informed of or briefed on every significant naval nuclear propulsion plant problem; from this, we determine if additional causes need to be identified or if additional corrective actions (technical or administrative) need to be taken" (74). He listed Reactor Safeguards Examinations as a proactive way for NR to ensure that reactors are being safely operated. Admiral Bowman also described his dual military/civilian appointment; as an Assistant Secretary of Energy, the Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion has "the final say over whether a Reactor is safe to operate" (52). Another point of interest is the program's view towards dissenting opinions, whether it is from one of the prime contractor laboratories or from headquarters' staff. Admiral Bowman described an environment in which dissenting opinions are documented and factored into the Director's decision-making, and one in which "there cannot be any fear of reprisal for raising concerns or issues" (81). 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:  29 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
8Title:  Atoms for Peace + 50: Nuclear energy & science for the 21st century Add
 Summary:  Transcript of remarks by Admiral Frank Bowman, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, at a Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis-sponsored conference in 2003. Bowman advocates for commercial nuclear power, arguing that the United States "take immediate steps to significantly increase our energy production from nuclear power" (3). He describes the primary attributes of the Naval Reactors program, including: "technical excellence and technical competence"; high standards for personnel selection; "formality and discipline" in plant operations; and, an approach to reactor safety that "mainsteams in each operator a total commitment to safety" (2). Bowman advocates for improved public education on nuclear power and radiation exposure to improve public support for commercial nuclear power. There are some typographical errors in this document. 
 Source:  http://www.ifpafletcherconference.com/oldtranscripts/2003/DOE/bowman.pdf 
 Date:  22 October 2003 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find

nrhdb Home