Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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1Title:  FY 1999 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This is the FY 1999 budget request for the Naval Reactors program. It describes the organization's mission ("'cradle to grave' responsibility for Naval nuclear propulsion work"). It provides detailed information on Naval Reactors operations at that period of time, and describes NR's areas of development to achieve improved power densities and extended core life. The evaluation and servicing section describes NR's requests to support defueling or dismantling the S1C, D1G, A1W, and S5G prototype plants. 
 Source:  www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/eng/navalr.pdf 
 Date:   1998 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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2Title:  Navy aircraft carriers: Cost-effectiveness of conventionally and nuclear-powered carriers Add
 Summary:  This 1998 GAO study analyzes the cost-effectiveness of nuclear-powered carriers compared with their conventional counterparts. Chapter 3 focuses on a primary finding, that .life-cycle costs for nuclear-powered aircraft carriers are greater than for conventionally-powered carriers. (74). This includes construction and modernization costs; support and operations costs; and, costs after decommissioning (.because of the extensive work necessary to remove spent nuclear fuel from the reactor plant and remove and dispose of the radiologically contaminated reactor plant and other system components. (74). The report notes that the Department of Defense .disagreed that comparing the life-cycle costs of conventionally powered carriers such as the U.S.S. John F. Kennedy with Nimitz-class nuclear-powered carriers was appropriate because of differences in the age, size, and capabilities of the carriers. (96). Chapter 4 describes the benefits of having a United States carrier homeported in Japan and the maintenance facility support that would be required to support a nuclear-powered carrier to be based there. (Note that the USS George Washington, CVN-73, has been based in Yokosuka, Japan since 2008.) Overall, the study provides a good analysis of the costs and benefits associated with naval nuclear propulsion for the carrier fleet. The last conventionally-powered carrier, the USS Kitty Hawk, was decommissioned in 2009; as of today, all United States Navy carriers are nuclear-powered. This study was published at a time when the best path for propulsion systems was being carefully analyzed. The chart on page 23 that compares the specifications of the USS John F. Kennedy (conventional) versus the USS Nimitz (nuclear) has several critical data items. In terms of aviation fuel capacity and ordnance capacity, the nuclear-powered carrier is vastly superior. In other ways not listed, such as sustained speed and the elimination of stack gases, the nuclear-powered carrier is again superior. 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:   1998 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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3Title:  IAEA/USA interregional training course on decontamination and decommissioning of research reactors and other Small Nuclear Facilities Add
 Summary:  This document, lecture notes created by Lawrence E. Boing of the Argonne National Laboratory, "presents an overview of the U.S. experiences in the decommissioning technical area" and provides information on the regulation of reactor decommissioning activities (1). Coverage includes commercial reactors, research reactors, naval reactors and prototypes, and other defense-related reactors. It includes a summary of the Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP), which was created to "perform the scrapping and disposition of all U.S. Navy nuclear powered vessels" (15). As described, this is accomplished in two steps: vessel stripping, which includes defueling of the reactor plant(s) and which can be performed at several United States shipyards; and, removal of the reactor compartment and scrapping of the vessel. Finally, the report includes information on the decommissioning of the Shippingport reactor (the design and construction of which was overseen by Naval Reactors). The notes conclude with Boing emphasizing the importance of experience and information sharing in reactor decommissioning work. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1998 
 Subject(s):  Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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4Title:  Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program meeting on Spent Naval Fuel (SNF) Add
 Summary:  This report includes a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for Acceptance of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) between the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) and the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The agreement "establishes the terms and conditions under which [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] will make available disposal services to NNPP for naval SNF" (3). More specifically, it was designed to "achieve safe and timely disposal of naval SNF by identifying data needs, interfaces and acceptance criteria and developing compliance procedures needed to support the acceptance of naval SNF" by the Department of Energy. 
 Source:  http://pbadupws.nrc.gov/docs/ML0331/ML033180083.pdf 
 Date:  10 December 1998 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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