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1Title:  Materials performance in operating PWR steam generators Add
 Summary:  This paper describes a challenge to the operation of pressurized water reactors on naval vessels: Steam generator U-tube leakage, primarily due to secondary chemistry problems. As described in the abstract, chemistry problems are centered in "those areas of the steam generators where limited coolant circulation and high heat flux have caused impurities to concentrate." Circulation problems (leading to cracking and corrosion) in Inconel U-tubes can be produced by "sludge deposits accumulated on the tube sheet or on tubing supports." In terms of prevention, the paper notes that "at the present time, all U.S. manufacturers of PWR's are recommending that their customers use an all-volatile treatment of the secondary coolant." It continues by providing water chemistry case studies on the three methods then used to maintain secondary chemistry: "A phosphate treatment, an all-volatile treatment, and a zero-solids treatment" (and the importance of moving from the first treatment method and attempting to reverse sludge problems in plants with extensive past use of phosphate treatments). Note: Some portions of the reproduced text are not legible. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1975 
 Subject(s):  Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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2Title:  Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program--1974 Add
 Summary:  This Joint Committee on Atomic Energy hearing document includes extensive testimony by Admiral Hyman Rickover, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion. Rickover opens by praising several committee members who chose not to stand for reelection in 1974. He reviews the names of committee members who have either died or left Congress - indeed, the Joint Committee was abolished within three years and the changes in Congress made Rickover's 1982 retirement much easier to accomplish. During the hearing, Rickover describes the efforts of Naval Reactors and industry to develop longer life cores for nuclear submarines and surface ships (10 to 13 years at the time of the hearing), including the path to cores that will last the life of the ship and cost issues. These included the higher research costs and the eventual savings obtained through reduced overhaul intervals and increased ship availability. Rickover also describes procurement for SSN-688 (Los Angeles-class) fast attack submarines. (The USS Los Angeles was launched earlier in 1974.) Rickover notes that "funds have been appropriated for 23 of these high-speed submarines, with advanced procurement funds for five more" (4). Finally, the 1973 naval nuclear propulsion (ships and support facilities) environmental monitoring report is included in the document. 
 Source:  http://collections.stanford.edu/atomicenergy/bin/search/advanced/process?clauseMapped%28catKey%29=5460466&sort=title 
 Date:   1975 
 Subject(s):  Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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3Title:  Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program--1975 Add
 Summary:  This document is the unclassified version of Admiral Hyman Rickover's March 5, 1975 testimony to the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. This hearing occurred during a time of transition, as the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) had replaced the Atomic Energy Commission and was now the civilian parent of Rickover's Naval Reactors organization. Rickover reports to the committee on the recent, successful sea trials of the USS Nimitz, the second nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. He also reports on the operation and construction of SSN-688 (Los Angeles) class high-speed fast attack submarines. This hearing record provides a great deal of information on the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Rickover describes its basic design: "We are now working on a breeder core to go into the existing Shippingport plant as a backfit. This breeder core will use light water instead of sodium as coolant." Continuing: "This breeder core will use the thorium/uranium-233 fuel cycle" (21). The LWBR enabled Naval Reactors to install the breeder core into the existing Shippingport reactor vessel and to leverage its experience with water-cooled plants in investigating breeding. During this testimony, Rickover and David Leighton of Naval Reactors contrast the LWBR design with liquid metal breeder reactors, including the significantly lower design costs of the LWBR and the greater breeding potential of the liquid metal design. Appendix 2 is a detailed report on the design, goals, and breeding process for the LWBR. 
 Source:  http://collections.stanford.edu/atomicenergy/bin/search/advanced/process?clauseMapped%28catKey%29=5461005&sort=title 
 Date:   1975 
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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