Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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1Title:  Tracking chart for USS Triton's submerged circumnavigation Add
 Summary:  A tracking chart that shows the route of the USS Triton, the first submarine to complete a submerged circumnavigation of the Earth (from 24 February to 25 April 1960). One purpose of this mission was to perform psychological stress testing on crew members, in preparation for the extended patrols planned for Polaris ballistic missile submarines. 
 Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USS_Triton_SSRN-586_circumnavigation_map_1960.jpg 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman. Atomic Submarines. London: Van Nostrand, 1963, pages 166-183. 
 Date:   1960 
 Subject(s):  S4G | USS Triton (SSRN-586) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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2Title:  USS Ethan Allen during her sea trials Add
 Summary:  The USS Ethan Allen, lead boat in her class, during sea trials in the Atlantic Ocean in late 1960. Historian Thomas Parrish described the four technical components that came together in the ballistic missile submarines built by the United States: "(1) proven nuclear propulsion, (2) reliable solid rocket propellant, (3) inertial shipboard navigation development, and (4) miniaturization of nuclear warheads." The S5W submarine fleet reactor was used to power the Ethan Allen. 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08608.htm 
 Reference:  Parrish, Thomas. The Submarine: A History. New York: Viking, 2004, pages 479-486. 
 Date:   1960 
 Subject(s):  S5W | USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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3Title:  Hunter-killer submarine USS Tullibee Add
 Summary:  The USS Tullibee returns from her initial sea trials in the fall of 1960. The sub's propulsion plant was designed for quiet operation, which was achieved by the elimination of reduction gears and the use of an electric propulsion system for all operations. Historian Francis Duncan notes that while the plant's design did result in a quieter propulsion system ("the quietest nuclear platform the Navy had"), it had its downside as well - a larger and heavier propulsion plant (23). Both the S1C prototype and the S2C reactor plant, installed on the Tullibee, were designed by Combustion Engineering; the Atomic Energy Commission awarded the projects to C-E in order to "broaden industrial participation in the [Naval Reactors] program" beyond Westinghouse and General Electric (23). 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08597.htm 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, page 23. 
 Date:  03 October 1960 
 Subject(s):  S2C | USS Tullibee (SSN-597) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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4Title:  Seed fuel assembly being removed from reactor vessel by an extraction crane Add
 Summary:  A highly-enriched Uranium fuel element is removed from the Shippingport reactor core in 1960. Alvin Radkowsky, the chief physicist for Naval Reactors, "suggested the possibility of using a 'seed' of highly-enriched uranium surrounded by a much larger 'blanket' of natural uranium" (244). This core design approach offered several advantages, including ease of refueling (by replacing the seed elements), and was employed in the Shippingport reactor cores during the plant's operations, including the Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core that was used from 1977 to 1982. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 242-246. 
 Date:  07 January 1960 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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5Title:  USS Hailbut fires a Regulus missile Add
 Summary:  The USS Halibut, commissioned in 1960, was originally designated as a guided missile submarine (SSGN-587). She was capable of carrying five Regulus I missiles. This subsonic missile had a range of 500 nautical miles and could carry a conventional or nuclear warhead. The Halibut conducted seven missile patrols in the North Pacific carrying Regulus I missiles. The Regulus program was cancelled in 1958 because of the transition to the Polaris ballistic missile program and the commissioning of ballistic missile submarines, beginning with the USS George Washington. In 1965, the Halibut was redesignated SSN-587; she was, as described by authors Norman Polmar and Michael White, converted to a special-mission, intelligence gathering submarine. 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08587b.htm 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman, and Michael White. Project Azorian: The CIA and the Raising of the K-129. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 2010. 
 Date:  31 March 1960 
 Subject(s):  S3W | USS Halibut (SSGN-587) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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6Title:  Naval reactor program and Polaris missile system Add
 Summary:  This document is the public record of a Joint Committee on Atomic Energy hearing on the Polaris missile submarine program. The hearing was conducted on board the USS George Washington, the first ballistic missile submarine, which was powered by the already-proven S5W reactor. The record describes the integration of nuclear propulsion technology, proven in earlier submarines such as the Nautilus, and ballistic missile technology, under the oversight of Admiral William F. Raborn. Its introduction describes the Joint Committee's focus on reactor safety, mentioning the 1961 SL-1 accident at the Idaho National Laboratory and the importance of the design, construction, and operation standards created by Naval Reactors: "The committee also looks to the Navy to meet the Atomic Energy Commission's safety standards in all aspects of its nuclear propulsion program and to resist any pressures to force this new technology into an old system which may have sufficed for ordinary propulsion" (VI). In his testimony, Admiral Hyman Rickover (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) notes that the first three Polaris subs were originally designed as attack submarines and converted to ballistic missile submarines. (All of these submarines were powered by the S5W reactor plant.) Rickover describes the unique aspects of the Naval Reactors program (for example, its close collaboration with Atomic Energy Commission laboratories and land prototypes in plant testing). The document includes correspondence between the Navy, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the AEC's Safeguards Committee, and the congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. The Joint Committee's ongoing and strong support of Admiral Rickover and the Naval Reactors program is reflected in an opening letter from its chair and ranking member to the Secretary of the Navy (pages 10 and 11 of the hearing document). 
 Source:  http://tinyurl.com/cj5c652 
 Date:  09 April 1960 
 Subject(s):  S5W | Reactor safety | Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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