Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
Favorites (0)
Search:
1959 in date [X]
rss icon RSS | Modify Search | New Search | nrhdb Home
Results:  5 itemsBrowse by Facet | Title
Sorted by:  
Page: 1
Subject
Naval Reactors (5)
Nuclear engineering (1)
Rickover, Hyman G. (1)
S2G (1)
S3W (1)
Date
collapse1959
expand09 (1)
expand06 (1)
Type
Image (3)
Text (2)
1Title:  USS Skate in the arctic region Add
 Summary:  The USS Skate surfaces in the arctic region. The Skate was powered by the S3W reactor, a successor to the S1W/S2W plants that was built withoutthe construction of a prototype. She traveled under the North Pole in August 1958, just eight days after the Nautilus' historic polar crossing. The Skate was built with a strengthened sail structure and improved fathometer equipment (compared with Nautilus) in order to improve the sub's ability to operate in the polar region. In March 1959, she conducted winter polar operations and surfaced near the North Pole. 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08578.htm 
 Reference:  Rockwell, Theodore. The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made a Difference. Lincoln, NE: IUniverse, 2002, pages 251-255. 
 Date:   1959 
 Subject(s):  S3W | USS Skate (SSN-578) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
2Title:  Defueling the S2G reactor Add
 Summary:  This report describes the defueling of Seawolf's S2G reactor plant at Electric Boat in January 1959. This defueling was accomplished as part of the Seawolf's conversion from the sodium-cooled, intermediate range S2G reactor to a pressurized water reactor (PWR), owing to problems with the sodium-cooled design. These serious problems, which plagued the S1G (or Mark A) prototype and S2G shipboard plants, demonstrated the clear superiority of the PWR design in submarine propulsion. The report describes the importance of training (for Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Electric Boat, and Navy personnel who worked on the defueling) consisting of lectures and dry-runs that took place in the fall of 1958. The dry-runs enabled workers to check the condition of refueling equipment and time estimates for the completion of maintenance steps. (The summary on page 18 describes the importance of dry-runs and recommends some best practices for accomplishing them.) The dry-runs also contributed to the success in minimizing radiation exposure when the refueling was performed: "No individuals were exposed to more than the maximum permissible daily dose, 50 [millirem]" (3). The report provides an overview of the steps performed in defueling the sodium-cooled reactor. It also provides a summary of lessons learned, including: failure of a brazed joint in a cup designed to catch sodium drippage from fuel elements, which was identified during the dry run operation and fixed by using cups with welded joints; and, gas leakage from a transfer cask. Also, there was a report of difficulty in grappling an S2G fuel rod that was being removed, due to wear in the grappling equipment. After completion of the refueling, the S2G's fuel rods were shipped via train to the Idaho National Laboratory's Expended Core Facility. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1959 
 Subject(s):  S2G | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
3Title:  Review of naval reactor program and Admiral Rickover award Add
 Summary:  This document is the unclassified record of two Joint Committee on Atomic Energy hearings from April 1959. At the second hearing, Vice Admiral Hyman Rickover, who led the Naval Reactors program, was presented with a congressional gold medal in recognition of his efforts, which included the successful application of nuclear power to submarines and Naval Reactors support for the first nuclear power plant designed for civilian purposes. A significant portion of the hearing addresses reactor safety and radiological controls issues. The joint Atomic Energy Commission and Navy responsibilities in the Naval Reactors program is nicely described by Rickover during a discussion on reactor safety: "Before the Nautilus reactor was started we drew up an agreement between the AEC and the Department of Defense which recognized that each agency had a responsibility where the safeguards aspect of naval reactors was concerned....This agreement, and the memorandums of understanding between the AEC and the Navy which followed it, provided that the AEC would present the design of the reactor plant to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards for a safety review and that the results of this review would be forwarded by the AEC to the Navy for their guidance. The reactor plant would then become the responsibility of the Navy, except that the Navy was obligated to make available to the AEC all pertinent information and data concerning operation, including safety standards and operational experiences" (5). The first April 1959 hearing was held on board the USS Skipjack, a newly-commissioned nuclear submarine, and both Rickover and Captain Eugene Wilkinson (the first captain of the USS Nautilus) describe the improvements between the Nautilus, which was commissioned in 1954, and the Skipjack, including improved speed and underwater performance, a shift to a single propeller for propulsion, and easing access to machinery for maintenance. Rickover describes the program's rapid growth, following the successful operation of the S1W plant, the Nautilus, and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. At this point in 1959, "Congress has authorized a total of 33 nuclear-powered submarines. Of the 33, 5 are presently in operation and the others are either under construction or shortly will be under construction....Congress has also authorized a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier...a nuclear-powered guided missile cruiser and a nuclear-powered fleet destroyer" (29-30). 
 Source:  http://collections.stanford.edu/atomicenergy/bin/search/advanced/process?clauseMapped%28catKey%29=3163480&sort=title 
 Date:   1959 
 Subject(s):  Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
4Title:  The George Washington - ballistic missile submarine Add
 Summary:  The USS George Washington (SSBN-598), the world's first ballistic missile submarine, being launched at Electric Boat in Groton, Connecticut in 1959. Because of the national security urgency of building a less-vulnerable missile system, the construction of the George Washington was expedited by using the bow and stern sections of the of the under-construction Scorpion, and inserting a 130 foot missile section between the two sections. She was powered by the submarine fleet reactor plant, the S5W. 
 Source:  http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=79363 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, page 315. 
 Date:  09 June 1959 
 Subject(s):  S5W | USS George Washington (SSBN-598) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
5Title:  USS Triton: Twin reactor submarine Add
 Summary:  The USS Triton during its sea trials in 1959. The Triton was driven by two S4G reactors and twin screws; the S4G's design was tested through the operation of the land-based S3G prototype. The S3G and S4G plants were the first pressurized water reactors designed and constructed by General Electric following the company's development of the sodium-cooled S1G and S2G reactors. 
 Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USS_Triton_SSRN586_0858601.jpg 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 272-276. 
 Date:  27 September 1959 
 Subject(s):  S4G | USS Triton (SSRN-586) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find

nrhdb Home