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1Title:  Stern view of USS Nautilus Add
 Summary:  The USS Nautilus underway in Long Island Sound in May 1955, eight months after her commissioning. 
 Source:  http://www.history.navy.mil/Special%20Highlights/Nautilus/nautilus2.htm 
 Date:   1955 
 Subject(s):  S2W | USS Nautilus (SSN-571) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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2Title:  A bibliography of available digital computer codes for nuclear reactor problems Add
 Summary:  This bibliography was compiled by Alvin Radkowsky, Naval Reactors' chief physicist and Robert S. Brodsky, who specialized in the application of digital computers to reactor design and shielding problems. The introduction describes the document's purpose: to provide "a ready listing of reactor computer codes presently available or in preparation." It also notes that "the codes are for digital computers of the size of the [IBM] Card Programmed Calculator (CPC) or larger" (iii). In their published study of the Naval Reactors program, historians Richard Hewlett and Francis Duncan described the role of computer codes in the design for the S5W reactor plant, which was built without the benefit of a prototype: "Such matters as shielding design posed major questions which could be resolved only with the development of new computer codes by both Bettis and Knolls under the direction of Radknowsky and Brodsky." 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1955 
 Subject(s):  Reactor physics | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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3Title:  An evaluation of data on zirconium-uranium alloys Add
 Summary:  This document, compiled by Frank Rough of the Battelle Memorial Institute, contains a review of information on zirconium-uranium alloys. As noted in the introduction, "because of the similar properties and fabricational characteristics of these materials, the cladding of zirconium-uranium alloys with Zircaloy has proven to be very successful, with good metallurgical bonds being obtained" (7). This review addresses issues such as the corrosion of zirconium-uranium alloys in high temperature/high pressure systems and the impact of neutron irradiation upon these alloys. These and other issues are addressed and mapped to an extensive bibliography. As described by historians Thomas Hewlett and Francis Duncan in their book Nuclear Navy, Naval Reactors was deeply involved in the development of zirconium production in the United States, with the need to produce tonnage lots of zirconium to support early prototype and submarine reactor core construction. Beyond this, improvements in the technology were needed, such as the development of Zircaloy-2, a material superior to the zirconium-uranium alloy used in the first Mark I/S1W core. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1955 
 Subject(s):  Zirconium/Zircaloy | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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4Title:  USS Seawolf at launching - Submarine Intermediate Range (SIR) reactor Add
 Summary:  The second commissioned nuclear-powered submarine was the USS Seawolf. At the time of her commissioning in March 1957, the Seawolf was powered by an S2G reactor plant, which followed the design and construction of the S1G land-based prototype plant. The plant used sodium as the coolant and beryllium as a moderator and reflector. One important advantage of using sodium as the coolant and heat transfer medium is that higher coolant and secondary steam temperatures are possible, which results in higher thermal efficiency. Additionally, the primary system can be maintained at a reliatively low pressure. Both of these factors enabled primary and secondary components to be lighter (compared with those installed in a pressurized water reactor plant). However, operation of the S1G and S2G plants revealed severe design problems, including primary-to-secondary leakage (and the potential of sodium reacting with water in the secondary system). In 1959, the Seawolf's S2G plant was removed and replaced with an S2Wa pressurized water reactor plant. 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08575a.htm 
 Reference:  Ragheb, Madgi. Nuclear Marine Propulsion. 20 July 2011 [http://tinyurl.com/3fm3azu]. 
 Date:  21 July 1955 
 Subject(s):  S2G | USS Seawolf (SSN-575) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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