Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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 Title:  Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (December 2, 1955 to January 12, 1956) Add
 Summary:  This 1955 report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. In addition to Westinghouse's role in the design and construction of early naval nuclear propulsion plants such as the S1W and S2W (Nautilus prototype and shipboard plants) and the S5W reactor, Westinghouse was the primary contractor for design and construction of the civilian Shippingport Atomic Power Station plant. The report describes Westinghouse's progress (and work with other vendors) in the design and fabrication of reactor core and primary and secondary system components for the Shippingport plant. Section I-A-7 provides information, including photographs, on the installation of the "nuclear portion of the power plant" (11). 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:  circa 1956 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (July 15 to August 26, 1954) Add
 Summary:  This report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. Westinghouse was the lead contractor for the design and construction of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station's reactor plant, the first in the world to generate civilian power on a large scale. Owing in large part to the success of Hyman Rickover and the Naval Reactors program in directing the design and construction of the Mark I/S1W prototype plant, Naval Reactors served in an oversight role, again working with Westinghouse, for the creation of the Shippingport plant. The report describes progress as of August 1955 on the reactor control, reactor coolant, secondary, and auxiliary systems. It also describes the status of core design and fuel fabrication efforts. Section I-A-1 provides information on plant functional requirements. Section II describes developmental efforts for the Shippingport plant, such as fuel element research and testing. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:  circa 1954 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (May 5 to June 16, 1955) Add
 Summary:  This report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. It describes the continued progress on the reactor and power plant at Shippingport, the first nuclear power plant in the world dedicated to the production of power for civilian use. Westinghouse worked under the direction of Naval Reactors in the design and construction of the plant and was the lead vendor for early naval reactor plants such as the S1W/S2W (Nautilus prototype and shipboard plants); the A1W/A2W (Enterprise prototype and shipboard plants); and, the S5W submarine fleet reactor. For that reason, sections of the report such as the description of fuel element failure instrumentation (page 23), are interesting, in that the information is applicable to pressurized water reactors in general. The "PWR Plant Parameters" section near the beginning of the report provides specific temperature, pressure, and power specifications for the Shippingport plant. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:  circa 1955 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Technical progress report: Pressurized water reactor program (September 9 to October 20, 1955) Add
 Summary:  This 1955 report provides a technical update on Westinghouse's work with pressurized water reactor development in the context of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station project. At this time, Westinghouse was the leading designer and builder of naval nuclear propulsion plants, having constructed the Mark I (S1W prototype) and Mark II (Nautilus shipboard) reactors, and designed the S5W submarine fleet reactor. Additionally, Westinghouse was working under the direction of the Naval Reactors organization on the design and construction of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station plant, the first large-scale nuclear power plant that provided power for civilian use. The report describes Westinghouse.s progress (and work with other vendors) in the design and fabrication of reactor core and primary and secondary system components for the Shippingport plant. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:  circa 1955 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Thermal shield being lowered into Shippingport reactor vessel Add
 Summary:  The thermal shield, which reduces the radiation that reaches the core vessel wall, being lowered into the Shippingport Atomic Power Station's reactor vessel. The shield rested on a support ledge inside the vessel. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 69-70. 
 Date:  11 April 1964 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Thermal shields centered over reactor vessel Add
 Summary:  The thermal shield positioned above the Shippingport reactor vessel. The core's thermal shields consisted of two stainless steel cylinders which rested inside the vessel. The shields reduced the core's radiation and, thus, the heat generated in the reactor's pressure vessel. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 69-70. 
 Date:  11 April 1964 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force: Final report Add
 Summary:  This report describes some long-term goals designed to improve reactor safety in the aftermath of the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI-2) in March 1979. It was produced by the TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force, an interdisciplinary group created by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the aftermath of the accident This report is relevant to naval nuclear propulsion in two ways. First, it describes design and operational issues for pressurized water reactors; both TMI-2 and the United States Navy's nuclear-powered vessels use the PWR design. Second, the report cites the concept of responsibility in the Naval Reactors program and the need to apply it in the commercial power industry: "In the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, Admiral Rickover has insisted that there be acceptance of personal responsibility throughout the program and that the designer, draftsman, or workman, and their supervisors and managers are responsible for their work and, if a mistake is made, it is necessary that those responsible acknowledge it and take corrective actions to prevent recurrence" (2-3). The report describes a range of remedies to improve reactor safety in commercial power plants. A special point of emphasis, given the circumstances of the accident at TMI-2, is on emergency operating procedures. Stating that the NRC's review of emergency operating procedures was inadequate, the report describes their essential elements: "Emergency operating procedures should consider system interactions and be written in such a manner that they are unambiguous and useful in crisis control. They should be based on thorough engineering evaluation and realistic analyses of the dynamic response of the nuclear power plant" (2-6). 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1979 
 Subject(s):  Reactor safety | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force: Status report and short-term recommendations Add
 Summary:  This document, known as NUREG-0578, was created by the Lessons Learned Task Force, an interdisciplinary group formed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident, which occurred on 28 March 1979. Of particular interest is the section on short-term recommendations, in which the task force proposes changes to operating procedures given the circumstances of the TMI-2 accident (a loss of feed in the secondary system, followed by a loss of coolant accident [LOCA] in the primary system of the pressurized water reactor, with resulting core damage). Several recommendations stand out. First, providing emergency power for critical services, such as pressurizer level indicator, pressurizer heaters, and power-operated control values. Second, performing periodic checking of primary system safety and relief valves. Third, and critically, ensuring that operators are trained to better diagnose "low reactor coolant level and inadequate core cooling using existing reactor instrumentation (flow, temperature, power, etc.)" (8). While the recommendations as a whole are focused on commercial power reactor plants, many of these operational recommendations are applicable to the pressurized water reactors operated in the Navy's submarine and surface force. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1979 
 Subject(s):  Reactor safety | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Tour of "USS Enterprise" and report on Joint AEC Naval Reactor Program Add
 Summary:  This document is based on a hearing that members of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy conducted on board the USS Enterprise in the spring of 1962. The hearing touched on a number of issues, involving both capabilities and costs, which factored into the adoption of nuclear propulsion for aircraft carriers. The first commanding officer of the Enterprise, Vincent P. de Poix, summarized the benefits of nuclear propulsion for carriers, including the ability to rapidly position the ship for air operations, the ability to sail to a trouble spot because of the carrier's support for sustained high-speed propulsion, and the absence of stack gases in the flight deck area, which minimizes aircraft corrosion in comparison with operations on an oil-fired carrier. The qualitative advantages that de Poix summarized, however, were weighed against quantitative advantages emphasized by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, who recommended in 1963 that the next carrier to be built (CV-67) be conventionally-powered. The hearing also provides a nice summary of the naval nuclear propulsion training program, including the role of the Idaho National Laboratory's A1W prototype. Both the Enterprise's Reactor Officer, D.P. Brooks, and the ship's Engineering Officer, R.S. Smith, testify at the hearing and describe training approaches and the organization of the Enterprise's nuclear-trained officers and operators on the ship. The hearing document also includes "A treatise on nuclear propulsion in surface ships." This study was commissioned by Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations, in late 1960 and was completed in early 1961. It detailed both the favorable and limiting aspects regarding the adoption of nuclear propulsion in surface ships. A cost factor of 1.5 was included in the study. As summarized by historian Francis Duncan, this finding suggested that "the navy could buy ten nuclear-powered ships or fifteen oil-fired ships of the same type for the same total sum." Admiral Hyman Rickover (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) also testified at this hearing and addressed both this cost factor and the capabilities provided by nuclear propulsion. Finally, pages 54 through 56 of the hearing document include Rickover's summary of Shippingport Atomic Power Station reactor attributes and the potential benefits that the work at Shippingport could have for the nation's commercial nuclear power industry. 
 Source:  http://collections.stanford.edu/atomicenergy/bin/search/advanced/process?clauseMapped%28catKey%29=3160343&sort=title 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 111-114. 
 Date:  31 March 1962 
 Subject(s):  A1W | A2W | USS Enterprise (CVN-65) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Rickover, Hyman G. | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Tracking chart for USS Triton's submerged circumnavigation Add
 Summary:  A tracking chart that shows the route of the USS Triton, the first submarine to complete a submerged circumnavigation of the Earth (from 24 February to 25 April 1960). One purpose of this mission was to perform psychological stress testing on crew members, in preparation for the extended patrols planned for Polaris ballistic missile submarines. 
 Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USS_Triton_SSRN-586_circumnavigation_map_1960.jpg 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman. Atomic Submarines. London: Van Nostrand, 1963, pages 166-183. 
 Date:   1960 
 Subject(s):  S4G | USS Triton (SSRN-586) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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