Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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 Title:  Main control console at Shippingport (looking north) Add
 Summary:  The main control console for the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. While the Naval Reactors organization, working with Westinghouse, led the design and development of the Shippingport reactor, some aspects of the plant - such as the large size of the control panels and the use of concrete for shielding - were quite different when compared with the submarine reactor plants that had been designed and built under NR's oversight. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Hewlett, Richard G., and Francis Duncan. Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974, pages 240-242. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Main control console at Shippingport (looking south) Add
 Summary:  A view of the control room at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, with the reactor control panel on the left and the turbine control panel in the center. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Main coolant pump, lower section, at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station Add
 Summary:  A reactor coolant pump at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The pump circulated water (which served as both coolant and moderator in the pressurized water reactor plant) through the core and the steam generator. One centrifugal pump was installed in each of the plant's four reactor coolant loops. Each pump had two operating speeds, to save electrical power when the plant was operated at below 50% reactor power. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 15 and 31-32. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Main coolant pump removed from operation Add
 Summary:  A reactor coolant pump removed from operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Shippingport reactor used four reactor coolant pumps, one for each primary loop. The single-stage, leak proof centrifugal pump supported the flow of coolant in the primary system; in addition to the coolant flow through the pump, lower temperature water circulated within the pump to remove heat and lubricate the motor bearings. The pump was powered by a 2,300 volt electric motor that supported full-speed and half-speed operations. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 31-33. 
 Date:  08 May 1964 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Management of key technologies in the UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme Add
 Summary:  Presentation slides created by Christopher Palmer (Assistant Chief Engineer of Rolls-Royce Submarines) describing technology management in the United Kingdom's Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme. Slide two provides the programme timeline. The first UK nuclear-powered submarine, the HMS Dreadnought, was powered by an S5W reactor and launched in 1960. The HMS Valiant, launched in 1966, was the first UK submarine powered by a Rolls-Royce pressurized water reactor plant. Both the UK and US programs are focused on building submarines that do not require refueling; slide 3 describes Rolls-Royce's Core H design, which achieves this goal. Slide 4 notes that future UK ballistic missile submarines will be powered by a next-generation plant, PWR3, which represents "a significant design evolution for the UK NNPP." In slide 5, Palmer describes the unique role of the UK NNPP in technology management, given its independent technical development and the depressed state of civilian nuclear power in the UK. He gives three examples in which the programme has taken the lead management role: "reactor core and plant performance analysis, validation and verification; major reactor plant component design; and, high integrity electrical design." Like its US counterpart (with its resources like the Bettis and Knolls laboratories), the UK NNPP has "dedicated infrastructure" that Palmer cites on slide 6. He continues by describing the collaborative efforts between the US and UK naval nuclear propulsion programs on slide 7, including the ability of both sides to gain an independent review of design approaches. In slides 10-12, Palmer describes programme challenges. In terms of decommissioned vessels, he notes that "current NNPP practice is afloat storage of defueled and decommissioned vessels (currently 17)" and that this capacity will be exhausted by 2020. This is contrast to the US approach of removing defueled reactor compartments and transporting them for storage at the Hanford Site; in part, this approach is a product of the larger number of decommissioned US nuclear submarines and ships. 
 Source:  http://csis.org/images/stories/poni/111201_Palmer.pdf 
 Date:  01 December 2011 
 Subject(s):  UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Map showing the location of Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Add
 Summary:  This map shows a section of the Idaho National Laboratory, including the location of the Naval Reactors Facility. In 1965, NRF included the S1W and A1W prototype plants, along with the recently-built S5G prototype and the Expended Core Facility (ECF); the latter two facilities are noted on the map. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ID0406/ 
 Date:  11 March 1965 
 Subject(s):  S5G | Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Materials performance in operating PWR steam generators Add
 Summary:  This paper describes a challenge to the operation of pressurized water reactors on naval vessels: Steam generator U-tube leakage, primarily due to secondary chemistry problems. As described in the abstract, chemistry problems are centered in "those areas of the steam generators where limited coolant circulation and high heat flux have caused impurities to concentrate." Circulation problems (leading to cracking and corrosion) in Inconel U-tubes can be produced by "sludge deposits accumulated on the tube sheet or on tubing supports." In terms of prevention, the paper notes that "at the present time, all U.S. manufacturers of PWR's are recommending that their customers use an all-volatile treatment of the secondary coolant." It continues by providing water chemistry case studies on the three methods then used to maintain secondary chemistry: "A phosphate treatment, an all-volatile treatment, and a zero-solids treatment" (and the importance of moving from the first treatment method and attempting to reverse sludge problems in plants with extensive past use of phosphate treatments). Note: Some portions of the reproduced text are not legible. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1975 
 Subject(s):  Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Mechanical properties of Zircaloy-2 Add
 Summary:  To summarize: "Zircaloy-2 is a zirconium-tin alloy developed for use in water cooled nuclear reactors. It possesses good corrosion resistance to high-temperature water, excellent nuclear characteristics, and sufficiently good mechanical properties for use as a structural material in reactor cores and as a fuel element material" (1). The report analyzes changes in Zircaloy-2 properties caused by changes in operating conditions, including temperature, hydrogen concentration, and the presence of small notches in the material. As noted in the Hewlett/Duncan book, Nuclear Navy, "the study of zirconium alloys [in the first half of the 1950s] resulted in the development of a new material called Zircaloy-2, which was far superior to the material used in the [Mark I/S1W] core." 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1961 
 Subject(s):  Zirconium/Zircaloy | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Missile tubes in USS Sam Rayburn Add
 Summary:  The USS Sam Rayburn during her service as a ballistic missile submarine. The submarine was decommissioned in 1989 and converted to a moored training S5W prototype facility. The Sam Rayburn is currently moored at Naval Weapons Station Charleston. 
 Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Sam_Rayburn_%28SSBN-635%29 
 Date:  circa 1964 
 Subject(s):  S5W | USS Sam Rayburn (SSBN-635) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Mobilis in mobile: History of the U.S.S. Nautilus Add
 Summary:  Slides from a presentation by Andy Rogulich of the North American Jules Verne Society at the organization's 2007 conference. Rogulich describes the history of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) and compares her with Verne's fictional Nautilus in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. Rogulich's comparison of attributes of the USS Nautilus and Verne's Nautilus (page 16) is particularly interesting. He describes his visit to the Historic Ship Nautilus and the fact that a signed first edition of Verne's "Twenty Thousand Leagues" is displayed on board the Nautilus museum. 
 Source:  http://www.najvs.org/meetings/meet2K7/index.shtm 
 Date:  08 July 2007 
 Subject(s):  S2W | USS Nautilus (SSN-571) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Monitoring equipment outside S1W hull Add
 Summary:  Navy and civilian operators with monitoring equipment at the aft end of the S1W propulsion plant. The S1W's water brake, which absorbed the shaft power, can be seen directly behind the monitoring panel. The aft end of the hull is visible at left. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_06.pdf 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S1W | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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