Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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 Title:  IAEA/USA interregional training course on decontamination and decommissioning of research reactors and other Small Nuclear Facilities Add
 Summary:  This document, lecture notes created by Lawrence E. Boing of the Argonne National Laboratory, "presents an overview of the U.S. experiences in the decommissioning technical area" and provides information on the regulation of reactor decommissioning activities (1). Coverage includes commercial reactors, research reactors, naval reactors and prototypes, and other defense-related reactors. It includes a summary of the Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP), which was created to "perform the scrapping and disposition of all U.S. Navy nuclear powered vessels" (15). As described, this is accomplished in two steps: vessel stripping, which includes defueling of the reactor plant(s) and which can be performed at several United States shipyards; and, removal of the reactor compartment and scrapping of the vessel. Finally, the report includes information on the decommissioning of the Shippingport reactor (the design and construction of which was overseen by Naval Reactors). The notes conclude with Boing emphasizing the importance of experience and information sharing in reactor decommissioning work. 
 Source:  http://www.osti.gov/bridge 
 Date:   1998 
 Subject(s):  Ship-Submarine Recycling Program (SRP) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Infrastructure - Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Add
 Summary:  This diagram describes the work of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, a joint Department of Energy and Navy program. Naval Reactors is "responsible for design, development, operation, and disposal of Naval nuclear propulsion plants." The program's training includes Naval Nuclear Power School (theoretical training) and prototype training, which is currently conducted on board moored ships and at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory's Kesselring site. NR oversees the work performed by public and private shipyards and contractual relationships with hundreds of specialized vendors. It also works with two major laboratories, Bettis and Knolls. This chart underscores the complexity of NR and the fact that its available infrastructure is managed by a relatively small central organization. 
 Source:  http://www.fas.org/man/gao/nsiad98001/c1.htm 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  GIF 
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 Title:  Instructions to bring Shippingport power breeder to 100 percent reactor power Add
 Summary:  An image showing President Jimmy Carter's instructions on 2 December 1987 to operators at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station to "increase light-water breeder reactor power to 100%" (191). Carter issued the order from the White House in a ceremony attended by Secretary of Energy James Schlesinger, Admiral Hyman Rickover, and other Naval Reactors officials; it marked the beginning of routine operations at the Shippingport plant following its conversion to a breeder reactor. The core, which generated more fuel than it consumed, was composed of U-233 and Thorium. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, pages 190-192. 
 Date:  02 December 1977 
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Integrated nuclear power systems for future naval surface combatants Add
 Summary:  This hearing was held in the context of the United States Navy's currently use of surface nuclear propulsion only for its aircraft carriers. Expanding nuclear propulsion to smaller surface ships, such as the then-planned CG(X) class, is a compelling option, particularly given high oil prices. Dr. Delores Etter (Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Research, Development and Acquisition) provides an analysis of the pros and cons of nuclear-powered surface combatants, concluding that, based upon fuel costs and expected energy demands, "nuclear power should be considered for near-term application for [medium-size surface combatants]" (3). One limiter in expanding the application of nuclear propulsion, cited by Etter, is the fact that "the nuclear portions of any surface combatant would need to be done at one of the two shipyards authorized to do such work: Northrup Grumman Newport News and General Dynamics Electric Boat" - two yards that are heavily engaged in submarine and aircraft carrier work (3). In his statement, Admiral Kirkland Donald (Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion) provides an introduction to pressurized water reactor technology and his responsibilities. As a follow-up to Etter's point on the two nuclear shipyards, Donald asserted that both shipyards "are currently operating below their capacity" (7). One interesting discussion between Admiral Donald and Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington concerns nuclear waste disposal; Donald describes the program's waste disposal at the Idaho National Laboratory's Naval Reactors Facility (13). There is also a discussion between Admiral Donald and Rep. Gene Taylor of Mississippi regarding the fact that only two of the five shipyards building surface combatants are qualified for nuclear work. On this point, Admiral Paul Sullivan of the Naval Sea Systems Command notes that "we are building warships in modular sections now," suggesting that significant construction could be performed by non-nuclear yards (17). In summary, the hearing record provides a good overview of the current issues involved in expanding nuclear propulsion beyond aircraft carriers. 
 Source:  http://www.fdsys.gov/ 
 Date:  01 March 2007 
 Subject(s):  Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Irradiated core materials received at the Expended Core Facility Add
 Summary:  Workers on the defueling platform at the Expended Core Facility (ECF), located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Rail cars enter the ECF and the transfer cask shown in the photo (just above the workers) is used to hoist expended fuel into a water pit, where processing begins. 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/proving-the-principle/chapter_10.pdf 
 Reference:  Stacy, Susan M. Proving the Principle: A History of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, 1949-1999. Idaho Falls, Idaho: Idaho Operations Office of the Dept. of Energy, 2000, pages 86-89. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  PNG 
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