Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
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 Title:  Hazards of military reactors Add
 Summary:  This collection of reports from 1961 and 1962 provide information on the hazards of military reactor plants, including issues relating to port visits for nuclear-powered ships and submarines. One of the most interesting documents is a 1959 letter (pages 47-49) from AEC chairman John McCone to Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations. It emphasizes the AEC's oversight responsibility for nuclear propulsion while noting that the Navy's operational control of nuclear-powered vessels. The letter also provides some insights into the AEC's role in reactor development oversight ("the design of each new class of reactors Is summarized in a Reactor Hazards Summary Report and presented by the Naval Reactors Branch and the reactor contractor for review by the Commission's safeguards staff and by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards")(48). One of the reports includes nformation on the Naval Reactors program's approach to the discharge of low-level radioactive fluids, including data on the amount of radioactivity discharged during 1960 (page 29). 
 Source:  https://www.osti.gov/opennet/servlets/purl/1047049/1047049.pdf 
 Date:  circa 1962 
 Subject(s):  Reactor safety | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  Highly enriched uranium: Striking a balance Add
 Summary:  This Department of Energy study was designed to "present a complete picture of the production, acquisition, and utilization of highly enriched uranium (HEU)" (1). The opening summary includes a definition of HEU: "Uranium that has been enriched to uranium-235 isotopic content of 20 percent or more" (1). The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program employs HEU in its reactor plants, including shipboard reactors and the training prototypes. Appendix F describes the factors that led to HEU's use in naval reactor plants, including the need for compact reactors and increased power output over time, along with the need for infrequent refueling or cores that last the lifetime of ship. A significant portion of the nation's HEU inventory (100 metric tons) is dedicated to the naval program's use. Additionally, the report notes that the reactor plant at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (which had been decommissioned by the time of the report's publication) used HEU; the Naval Reactors organization led the design and construction of the Shippingport plant, which was "the first large-scale nuclear power electrical generating plant in the United States" (120). 
 Source:  http://www.fas.org/sgp/othergov/doe/heu/index.html 
 Date:   2001 
 Subject(s):  Highly enriched uranium (HEU) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
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 Title:  HMS Dreadnought, first British nuclear submarine Add
 Summary:  The HMS Dreadnought, the first British nuclear-powered submarine. In both her overall design and propulsion plant, the Dreadnought mirrored the six United States submarines of the Skipjack class. The Dreadnought was powered by an S5W reactor; Westinghouse worked with the British manufacturer Rolls Royce on the construction of the propulsion plant. Electric Boat provided assistance to the Vickers-Armstrong Limited shipyard for the submarine's construction. 
 Source:  http://forummarine.forumactif.com/t5047-sous-marin-nucleaire-d-attaque-hms-dreadnought 
 Reference:  Polmar, Norman. Atomic Submarines. London: Van Nostrand, 1963, pages 149-151. 
 Date:   unknown  
 Subject(s):  S5W | HMS Dreadnought (S101) | UK Naval Nuclear Propulsion Programme | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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 Title:  Hunter-killer submarine USS Tullibee Add
 Summary:  The USS Tullibee returns from her initial sea trials in the fall of 1960. The sub's propulsion plant was designed for quiet operation, which was achieved by the elimination of reduction gears and the use of an electric propulsion system for all operations. Historian Francis Duncan notes that while the plant's design did result in a quieter propulsion system ("the quietest nuclear platform the Navy had"), it had its downside as well - a larger and heavier propulsion plant (23). Both the S1C prototype and the S2C reactor plant, installed on the Tullibee, were designed by Combustion Engineering; the Atomic Energy Commission awarded the projects to C-E in order to "broaden industrial participation in the [Naval Reactors] program" beyond Westinghouse and General Electric (23). 
 Source:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08597.htm 
 Reference:  Duncan, Francis. Rickover and the Nuclear Navy: The Discipline of Technology. Annapolis, Md: Naval Institute Press, 1990, page 23. 
 Date:  03 October 1960 
 Subject(s):  S2C | USS Tullibee (SSN-597) | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
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