Naval Reactors History Database (nrhdb)
Favorites (0)
Browse by: TitleNew Search | nrhdb Home
Results: 8 ItemsBrowse by Facet | Title
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z
 Title:  Foster Wheeler straight tube steam generator Add
 Summary:  One of the two Foster Wheeler straight tube steam generators being placed in a boiler room in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Each generator contained 2,096 stainless steel tubes, with each tube having an outer diameter of one-half inch. The heads of the steam generator each had 18 inch pipe connections to the secondary system. 
 Source:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/PA1658/ 
 Reference:  U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Duquesne Light Company, and International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co, 1958, pages 33-34. 
 Date:  10 August 1958 
 Subject(s):  Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Image 
 Format:  JPEG 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  Fuel summary report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Add
 Summary:  This report provides an in-depth analysis of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core installed in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station from 1977 to 1982. The core "was developed to prove the concept of a pressurized water breeder reactor" (iv). Its operation was successful, in that the "LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy" (1-1). The core's design was based on a Thorium/U-233 fuel cycle. The U-233 isotope was used because of its high neutron regeneration factor ("the average number of neutrons produced in fission for each neutron absorbed in fissile fuel") relative to U-235 and Pu-239 (3-1). The LWBR design was similar to the two earlier PWR core its use of a seed-blanket design for the reactor fuel. However, one difference between the LWBR and the PWR cores that preceded it in the Shippingport plant was the control mechanism: instead of Hafnium control rods, the breeder plant "was designed with a movable seed, which was raised and lowered to control neutron absorption" (iv). That is, "to start up the reactor, the seed assemblies were raised, bringing the U-233 bearing parts of the fuel closer together"; to shut down the reactor, the fuel assembly was lowered (3-1). Another innovation in the core's design was the use of a Throrium reflector blanket to reduce neutron leakage. Section 2 includes a detailed description of the breeding decay series (in which Th-232 is converted to Uranium) and of the fuel assembly. Section 5 of the report notes one challenge of the transition from the PWR to LWBR design: "the use of the U-233/Th fuel system led to the need for an extensive analysis of available cross section data and other nuclear data for U-233 and Thorium, which had previously been given less attention than U-235 and U-238" (5-1). 
 Source:  http://www.inl.gov/technicalpublications/Documents/2664750.pdf 
 Date:   2002 
 Subject(s):  Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) | Shippingport Atomic Power Station | Nuclear engineering | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  FY 1999 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This is the FY 1999 budget request for the Naval Reactors program. It describes the organization's mission ("'cradle to grave' responsibility for Naval nuclear propulsion work"). It provides detailed information on Naval Reactors operations at that period of time, and describes NR's areas of development to achieve improved power densities and extended core life. The evaluation and servicing section describes NR's requests to support defueling or dismantling the S1C, D1G, A1W, and S5G prototype plants. 
 Source:  www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/eng/navalr.pdf 
 Date:   1998 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  FY 2002 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This budget document describes Naval Reactors' budget needs as of the first half of 2001. The evaluation and servicing section provides information on the state of the prototype plants (with S8G and MARF in use) and the work to deplete the Advanced Fleet Reactor (the S6W core, installed in the S8G prototype) for core testing purposes. The document provides a good overview of the current and in-development technologies being supported by NR in 2001. 
 Source:  http://www.cfo.doe.gov/budget/02budget/nvlreact/nvlreact.pdf 
 Date:   2001 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  FY 2003 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This document provides an extremely detailed analysis of the FY 2003 budget request for the Naval Reactors program. The section on operational lifetimes (page 12 of file) notes that the Enterprise and a number of Los Angeles-class submarines are serving for far longer than their designed lifetimes. The request describes the fact that six of the eight land-based prototypes had been shutdown by 2002 and were in the process of being deactivated. It provides reports on the units within Naval Reactors, including mission goals, recently-completed activities, and planned projects. 
 Source:  www.cfo.doe.gov/budget/03budget/content/nvlreact/navelrea.pdf 
 Date:   2002 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  FY 2005 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This budget document describes Naval Reactors funding for the 2005 fiscal year, and for the preceding fiscal years. The program's fundamental purpose is stated: "Provide the Navy with safe, militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their continued safe and reliable operation" (521). The budget document describes the development of the CVN 21 (later designated as A1B) reactor, the successor to the A4W plants that power the Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. As noted, the A1B plants will provide over 25% more energy than the A4W plants and require significantly fewer propulsion plant operators. The document also describes Naval Reactors' work with Transformational Technology Core (TTC) pressurized water reactors, which will "deliver a significant energy increase to future VIRGINIA-class" submarines (522). The "Memos and Strategies" section (526) describes the program's relationship to the Bettis and Knolls laboratories. 
 Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A1B_reactor 
 Date:   2004 
 Subject(s):  A1B | Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  FY 2006 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  The fiscal year 2006 budget request for Naval Reactors. Beyond the primary goal of plant safety, the request describes NR's strategic efforts "to increase core energy, to achieve life-of-the-ship cores, and to eliminate the need to refuel nuclear powered ships" (557). These development efforts included the reactor plant design for the CVN 21 class (the A1B reactor) and the Transformational Technology Core (TTC) for Virginia-class fast attack submarines. One motive behind TTC described in the request was "the need to transition from 97 to 93 percent enriched Uranium fuel. This transition is necessitated by the shutdown of the high enrichment plant and the decision to use Uranium recovered from retired nuclear weapons as starter material for naval nuclear reactors" (558). The "Reactor Technology and Analysis" section provides more in-depth coverage of NR's TTC work. 
 Source:  http://www.mbe.doe.gov/budget/06budget/Content/Programs/Vol_1_NNSA_3.pdf 
 Date:   2005 
 Subject(s):  Budgetary information | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find
 Title:  FY 2014 Naval Reactors budget request Add
 Summary:  This document contains the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) congressional budget request for FY 2014, which includes a request for $1.246 billion dollars for Naval Reactors. The request notes that Naval Reactors manages "96 operating reactor plants. This includes 72 submarines, 10 aircraft carriers, and 4 research, development, and training platforms (including the land-based prototypes)" (643). It also describes several milestones for the Naval Reactors program for the previous fiscal year, including the commissioning and construction of Virginia-class submarines. Two planned milestones for FY 2014 are stated: The "cumulative completion of 99% of the Gerald R. Ford-class next-generation aircraft carrier reactor plant design" and the "cumulative completion of 22% of the Ohio-class Ballistic Missile Submarine Replacement (Ohio replacement) reactor plant design" (642). The significant advances that will be achieved by the new plant design for the Gerald R. Ford-class (the A1B reactor) are mentioned in the request. Compared with the A4W reactor plants that power Nimitz-class carriers, the A1B "increases core energy, provides nearly three times the electric plant generating capability, and requires half the number of reactor department sailors" (643). Support for three major projects is included in the NNSA request: The Ohio-class development; refueling and overhaul of the S8G prototype; and, recapitalization of spent fuel processing equipment at the Idaho National Laboratory's Expended Core Facility (ECF). The ECF's mission and the importance of this recapitalization project are described in detail: "The ECF provides the infrastructure to unload shipping containers and transfer, prepare, temporarily store, and package naval spent nuclear fuel for disposal" (664). While maintenance and repair operations are performed for the ECF infrastructure, the recapitalization work is needed to ensure that the ECF can meet the demands for spent fuel processing and to avoid any "mission-compromising interruptions" that would threaten operations of the nuclear fleet (664). 
 Source:  http://nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/budget 
 Date:   2013 
 Subject(s):  Expended Core Facility | Naval Reactors 
 Type:  Text 
 Format:  PDF 
 Similar items:  Find